Falling Into the Traps Set By the Banks

For the past 15 years there has been a huge chasm between what a document says and what actually occurred. In foreclosure settings, the conscious decision has been made to ignore the Truth and proceed on the falsehoods promulgated by the banks. This arises from the “national security” fear that if the banks are not allowed to continue their fraudulent behavior, the entire financial system will collapse taking the entire society down with it. This myth is promulgated by the Banks, who supply the government with people to regulate the banks. Even as a theory it is untested, and unsupported by any real evidence. Unfortunately for Americans, too many people believe it.

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THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A LEGAL OPINION UPON WHICH YOU CAN RELY IN ANY INDIVIDUAL CASE. HIRE A LAWYER.
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We are constantly analyzing the documentation that is produced by the banks or their surrogates. But we are failing our clients when we say that something actually occurred just because a piece of paper says it occurred.
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“Prepared by” is just a hearsay statement that the document was prepared by the entity identified after those words. It does not mean that the document was in fact prepared by that entity — usually a title or closing agent — nor does it necessarily mean that the identified entity actually even handled the document.
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Too often, and virtually the rule, is that facially valid documents are telling the truth about what occurred. In the present context of “lending” the facially valid documents relied upon by foreclosing parties are usually fabricated, forged, robosigned and prepared by entities who create and maintain the records upon which the foreclosure proceeds — separate and apart from the alleged “Trust” or other “owner” and separate and apart from the party identified as the servicer but who actually do nothing except lend its name for use in a foreclosure.
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We don’t want to be saying (and therefore admitting) that the title or closing agent DID prepare the document — but rather admit the obvious: that the document says that they prepared it. It is the same with other documents.
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We don’t want to say that an assignment was made; in our reports we say that the document labeled “assignment” says there was an assignment. It is easy to fall into the trap of assuming that basic references are truthful when in fact they are not. We do a disservice to our customers if we submit a report that plays right into the hands of the banks. It also misdirects the lawyer or pro se litigant into failing to object to the references within a facially valid document because then those defenses are probably waived.
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But looking at the “prepared by” and “return to” instructions on an instrument may give you another lead to a witness who is unwilling to lie about the the alleged transaction.
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The closing agent or escrow agent may be willing to state that they received money, as they were instructed, and that they dispersed the money as instructed. They might be willing to admit that they did not prepare the documents but rather received them from a source that also might not have prepared them. And they might be willing to admit that they have no knowledge of from whence the money came for the alleged “closing.” Thus their testimony could be that they can provide no foundation to the assertion that a loan was made by the named mortgagee or beneficiary.
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A facially valid document, particularly if it is recorded in the public records, normally carries with it a presumption of truthfulness unless there is evidence to suggest that the document was fabricated, forged, robosigned or that there are other indications that the document is just a self-serving fabrication. But the admission of such a document into evidence should be the start of the argument not the end.
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Once the document is admitted into evidence, hopefully over the timely objection of foreclosure defense counsel (lack of foundation), the statements within the documents are hearsay unless the hearsay objection is waived. Those statements, without foundation testimony cannot be used as foundation for other testimony about the authority of the “servicer”, the “trustee,” or anyone else posing as owner or servicer of the DEBT.
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A simplified example: A warranty deed executed by John Doe, executed with the formalities required by statute is a facially valid instrument. The recipient Jane Roe received title ownership of the property according to the provisions stated on the face of the deed. If the deed is then recorded in the County records, it establishes notice to all the world that Jane Roe is the owner of the property described in the deed.
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But if John Doe never owned the property then the deed conveys nothing. It is a wild deed. It can be ignored by the world and everyone else. It can be removed from chain of title generally by a quiet title action (lawsuit in local jurisdiction) or simply an affidavit saying that John Doe mistakenly executed the deed describing the wrong property or whatever situation arose to cause the recording of a false deed in the chain of title to someone else’s property.
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But if Jane Roe insists that she does own the property described in the false deed and acts on that assertion, that is where things get messy. If Jane Roe files a quiet title or other lawsuit and presents the facially valid warranty deed from John Doe, the deed will be admitted into evidence, probably over the objections of the real property owner. It is admitted to prove only that the document exists in the county records and NOT to prove that the truthfulness of representations on the deed (“Grantor is full seized and owner of the property”), which is still the burden of proof for Jane Roe. There is also generally a representation as to the payment of good and valuable consideration, which we will presume Jane Roe never paid and obviously can’t prove. And THAT is where Jane Roe’s case should fail.
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The mistake made by pro se litigants and lawyers defending foreclosures is that they don’t go back to these basics. The original note and mortgage may indeed have been signed by the present homeowner. But the representations concerning payment of good and valuable consideration by the party named as mortgagee (or beneficiary under the deed of trust) are untrue as to most of the original “transactions” and therefore all succeeding documentation purporting to “sell’ grant bargain and deed” the note and mortgage to another party. Even where the originator does fund the initial “loan” (a small minority of originated documentation) the assignments are mysteriously missing any actual payment and therefore there can be no proof of payment of good and valuable consideration.
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In plain language, the fact that the homeowner owes SOMEBODY doesn’t mean that they owe just ANYBODY.
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For the past 15 years there has been a huge chasm between what a document says and what actually occurred. In foreclosure settings, the conscious decision has been made to ignore the Truth and proceed on the falsehoods promulgated by the banks. This arises from the “national security” fear that if the banks are not allowed to continue their fraudulent behavior, the entire financial system will collapse taking the entire society down with it. This myth is promulgated by the Banks, who supply the government with people to regulate the banks. Even as a theory it is untested, and unsupported by any real evidence.
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It is this policy of presumptive national security that has sacrificed the lives of 20 million people thus far.
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Questionable Documents: Investigation and Discovery Required
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NOTE: Analytical reports on title or securitization are not evidence without foundation testimony and/or affidavit, as the court permits. Our analytic summaries represent our observation and opinion as to issues regarding Chain of Title, Authenticity, Forgery, Fabrication or Robo-signing. Actions to be considered include sending a Qualified Written Request (QWR) under RESPA, Debt Validation Letter (DVL) under FDCPA, letters/complaints to State Attorney General and Consumer Financial Protections Board, and legal claims and defenses as to Legal Standing.

DO YOU DARE ISSUE A WARRANTY DEED OR ANY DEED WITHOUT LIABILITY?

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The inescapable conclusion at this point, is that title on more than 100 million real estate transactions is at the very least in doubt and quite probably corrupted. In legalese that would be expressed as clouded, unmarketable (i.e., you can’t sell it or finance it, because nobody will take it), defective or fatally defective. The only exceptions I can think of are those deals where raw land has been purchased from a long-standing owner with no debt attached to the land or where a home is purchased or refinanced where the last transaction is twenty years ago. Most people are unaware that they are sitting on shifting sands instead of a solid foundation — where title is properly recorded in the recording office of the county in which the property is located.

Yet people and institutions are issuing instruments fraught with liability and the high probability that the transaction — and the representations contained in the instrument they signed —- will be the subject of litigation later when someone tries to clear title or collect damages. Here are some examples:

  1. A Warranty Deed, required in most transactions, requires the person signing to (a) attest and prove they are who they say they are (b) that they or the party whom they represent has title (usually fee simple absolute) and (c) that if they are signing as an agent, they have provided proof (usually recorded with the deed in properly recordable form) of their authority. The signor is promising, in exchange for the consideration paid, that if this Warranty Deed turns out to be challenged by anyone, they will defend the challenge and pay damages if they lose. Reliance on the title company, mortgage banker, mortgage lender or anyone else is not a defense although the signor could cross claim against those people and bring them into the lawsuit. The point is that the cost of litigating these cases could rise into tens of thousands of dollars. The cost of losing could rise into hundreds of thousands of dollars, or even millions of dollars. 
  2. A “Special Warranty Deed” might have some language of limitations that SHOULD put the buyer on notice but most people rely upon the title or closing agent, or their lawyer (if they have one) to make sure that the deed gives them the title they thought they were getting. This too could give rise to litigation because of representations at closing, representations in the title commitment or policy etc.
  3. A Satisfaction of Mortgage requires the person signing to (a) attest and prove they are who they say they are (b) that they or the party whom they represent is the creditor and is the owner of the rights under the mortgage or deed of trust and (c) that if they are signing as an agent, they have provided proof (usually recorded with the Satisfaction in properly recordable form) of their authority. The signor is promising (unless someone played withe the wording), in exchange for the consideration paid, that if this Satisfaction turns out to be challenged by anyone, they will defend the challenge and pay damages if they lose. Reliance on the title company, mortgage banker, mortgage lender or anyone else is not a defense although the signor could cross claim against those people and bring them into the lawsuit. The point is that the cost of litigating these cases could rise into tens of thousands of dollars. The cost of losing could rise into hundreds of thousands of dollars, or even millions of dollars. 
  4. A Release and Reconveyance is the same as a Satisfaction of Mortgage. So whether you received a satisfaction of mortgage or a release and reconveyance, your assumption that the prior lien was paid off and is now officially satisfied and removed from the records as encumbrance on the land may be, and I think, probably is wrong. We have seen several cases here at livinglies where the wrong party (Ocwen in one case) took the oney issued the Satisfaction and then refused to either give back the money or provide any additional information even though it is now apparent that they were not the creditor, not he owner of the mortgage and had no authority to issue the satisfaction. 
  5. A Trustees Deed on Foreclosure is much the same as a Warranty Deed. Potential Trustee liability here is huge. It requires the person signing to (a) attest and prove they are who they say they are (b) that they or the party whom they represent is the Trustee or “substitute Trustee” (see below) and is the owner of the rights under the mortgage or deed of trust, (c) that if they are signing as an agent, they have provided proof (usually recorded with the Satisfaction in properly recordable form) of their authority and (d) that they are in fact the Trustee and that they have performed the statutory duties of due diligence that is required of a Trustee under a Deed of Trust. The signor is promising (unless someone played withe the wording), in exchange for the consideration paid, that if this Deed turns out to be challenged by anyone, they will defend the challenge and pay damages if they lose. Reliance on the “beneficiary” who usually comes out of nowhere, “lender” who also usually comes out of nowhere, title company, mortgage banker, mortgage lender or anyone else is not a defense although the signor could cross claim against those people and bring them into the lawsuit. The point is that the cost of litigating these cases could rise into tens of thousands of dollars. The cost of losing could rise into hundreds of thousands of dollars, or even millions of dollars. The banks don’t actually worry about this because most “Trustees” are “substitute Trustees” in which a substitution was filed given apparent authority to a new “Trustee” who is not an independent title agent or some similar entity but rather an agent that is in the foreclosure business with the bank that has inserted itself into the transaction as a “pretender lender.” Due diligence by the Trustee would have revealed most robosigning and other fraudulent practices, but due diligence, contrary to the requirements of statute, was never performed because they were no longer taking the orders from the legislature. They were skipping over their statutory duties and taking orders from a party who is merely alleged to be the lender even though it is not the same party as stated on the original note and mortgage ( deed of trust).
  6. Substitution of Trustee: Until securitization came into play it was a rare occurrence that the trustee would be substituted. The Trustee on teh Deed of Trfust would simply be given instructions by the payee on the note and the named secured party in the mortgage) deed of trust) to commence default and dforeclosure proceedigns. But now in virtually every foreclosure there is first a “substitution of trustee’probably because the original trustee would perform the due diligence required under statute and revealed potential problems which would have held up or cancelled the foreclosure. requires the person signing to (a) attest and prove they are who they say they are (b) that they or the party whom they represent is the creditor and is the owner of the rights under the mortgage or deed of trust and (c) that if they are signing as an agent, they have provided proof (usually recorded with the Satisfaction in properly recordable form) of their authority. The signor is promising (unless someone played withe the wording) that if this Substitution of Trustee turns out to be challenged by anyone, they will defend the challenge and pay damages if they lose. Reliance on the “beneficiary” who usually comes out of nowhere, “lender” who also usually comes out of nowhere, title company, mortgage banker, mortgage lender or anyone else is not a defense although the signor could cross claim against those people and bring them into the lawsuit. In many cases the substance of the substitution is that the “new” beneficiary is in effect appointing itself or its agents who promise to do their bidding instead of using the original Trustee or someone else who take their duties seriously. The point is that the cost of litigating these cases could rise into tens of thousands of dollars. The cost of losing could rise into hundreds of thousands of dollars, or even millions of dollars. The banks don’t actually worry about this because most “Trustees” are “substitute Trustees” in which a substitution was filed given apparent authority to a new “Trustee” who is not an independent title agent or some similar entity but rather an agent that is in the foreclosure business with the bank that has inserted itself into the transaction as a “pretender lender.” Due diligence by the Trustee would have revealed most robosigning and other fraudulent practices, but due diligence, contrary to the requirements of statute, was never performed because they were no longer taking the orders from the legislature. They were skipping over their statutory duties and taking orders from a party who is merely alleged to be the lender even though it is not the same party as stated on the original note and mortgage ( deed of trust).

There are many other documents that fall within the same level of analysis like the Notice of Default (which comes from the alleged authority of the  Substitute Trustee, based upon information from what is probably an undisclosed source, the Notice of Sale (which appears right on its face, but is subject to the same analysis as to the signor, and other documents.

The Bottom Line is that homeowners and institutions alike are facing potential litigation and liability as the years roll on, with few if any witnesses to back them up and in the case of homeowners precious little in the way of resources to fight off the litigation.

Check with a real property and litigation attorney before you take any action based upon what you see here. They should be licensed in the county in which the property is located.

Deleveraging: Borrowers Paying Off Loans Early — But Who Signs the Satisfaction of Mortgage?

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It could get even worse, and probably will. The current status of title and the current status of these obligations is such that a moral hazard exists that is sure to be exploited by a new group of third parties who perceive the opportunity. Because the title question is not resolved and the status of the obligation is not revealed, ANYONE can make the claim that they are the creditor and ANYONE can pretend to be an “institution.” They will take your money in a scam, give you a satisfaction of mortgage that meets the statutory standards as to form and you will record it only to find out that nobody ever heard of the people who took the payoff on your mortgage. By the way, this group is no different from the current group of pretender lenders who are doing the exact same thing.

EDITOR’S COMMENT: If you don’t know the identity of the creditor, how do you pay off your loan? The answer is that any of the securitization players including “servicers” will be more than happy to take your money and they might even give you a satisfaction of mortgage. If it is a credit card, they will be happy to give you a statement that says you don’t owe any more money. That ought to feel good, right? A growing number of people who still have some money are using it to reduce their debt a process called “deleveraging” in the world of finance. The net result for the economy is that instead of buying stuff they don’t need, people are taking the advice of people like Dave Ramsey on Fox and going for a new brass ring — NO DEBT.

The problem again is the attempted securitization of the receivables and the obfuscation of the identity of the owner of the loan. A satisfaction of mortgage from someone who that doesn’t own the loan is the same as a deed from someone who doesn’t own the house. Don’t be too surprised if down the road you start getting dunning letters from collection bureaus claiming you still owe the money.

It doesn’t matter how you are paying off a loan — sale of property, securities or refinancing — if you don’t have the right party in the room as the “lender”, you have a title and a credit problem. The satisfaction of mortgage from a party with no financial interest in the loan is a wild deed — void. A statement that reciting the payoff of the loan is worthless if it comes from someone to whom you do not owe the money.

All roads lead back to the same question — who is the creditor and what exactly is the current status of the obligation after the receivable has been sliced, diced, paid off from collateral sources without subrogation and otherwise closed out long before you proposed to pay it off. In fact you might be proposing to pay off something that no longer exists.

Lawyers who ask me about this, because it is coming up more and more, get two pieces of advice from me — either get a release letter from the client that says they acknowledge that this transaction might not be what it seems and that title is clouded, defective or unmarketable OR get a court order declaring the status of title to be as set forth in the new deal where the mortgage is being paid off — a quiet title action in which the parties cooperate. Otherwise, I tell them, you are a walking target for malpractice or discipline when the client finds out that the the transaction is a legal nullity.

It could get even worse, and probably will. The current status of title and the current status of these obligations is such that a moral hazard exists that is sure to be exploited by a new group of third parties who perceive the opportunity. Because the title question is not resolved and the status of the obligation is not revealed, ANYONE can make the claim that they are the creditor and ANYONE can pretend to be an “institution.” They will take your money in a scam, give you a satisfaction of mortgage that meets the statutory standards as to form and you will record it only to find out that nobody ever heard of the people who took the payoff on your mortgage.

Then there is the possibility, some say probability, that anyone signing a deed that guarantees they have title (called a Warranty Deed) could and probably will get sued for breach of that warranty when it is discovered that the signor either had no interest in title, even though they thought they did, or that they conveyed title with an encumbrance which was represented as satisfied but in fact still is in the title chain.

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US borrowers pay off home loans

By Suzanne Kapner in New York, Financial Times

Published: December 13 2010 18:58 | Last updated: December 13 2010 18:58

A growing number of US borrowers are paying off their mortgage balance ahead of schedule, reversing a trend that saw them extract record amounts of cash from their homes by taking out ever larger loans during the housing bubble.

The reduction in mortgage balances is part of a larger move by consumers to pare back their debt in the wake of the financial crisis. Consumers are also using disposable income to reduce credit card debt.

The shift is having an impact on the shape of the US recovery. Such deleveraging “will be good for economic growth over the long term, but not in the short term”, said Frank Nothaft, chief economist of Freddie Mac, the government-owned mortgage finance company.

It also speaks to the weakness of the housing market. Borrowers can no longer count on rising home prices to inflate their spending power. In fact, with home prices falling, some borrowers will find themselves owing more on their mortgage than their homes are worth unless they pay off their principal, making it difficult to sell their home or refinance.

Lenders said that more borrowers are choosing to make mortgage payments every other week, as opposed to once a month, which works out to an extra payment a year and can save thousands of dollars in interest.

Other borrowers are opting for shorter-term mortgages, which will leave them debt-free sooner, but also require higher upfront payments than do standard 30-year fixed-rate loans.

A record number of borrowers are also paying off principal when they refinance, a process known as “cashing-in” that is the opposite of the “cash outs” popularised during the housing boom, when rising home prices allowed borrowers to refinance into larger loans and pocket the difference.

With home prices falling, such “cash outs” dropped in the third quarter to their lowest level in 25 years. Meanwhile, mortgage debt outstanding has been shrinking since the second quarter of 2008, after growing steadily during the previous three decades.

Brad Blackwell, a national sales manager for Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, said he is seeing more borrowers pay off their mortgages faster. Wells Fargo has seen a 10 per cent increase since January in the number of customers enrolled in its bi-weekly mortgage plan.

The savings can be significant. A borrower with a $200,000 mortgage that carries a 5 per cent interest rate could save $33,000 and repay the loan five years early simply by making one extra payment a year, according to Victoria Clement, a senior vice president of Loan Depot.

CMG Mortgage, based in San Ramon, California, encourages borrowers to deposit their entire paycheck into what it calls a “home ownership accelerator account,” which acts like a checking account, but automatically funnels any money not used for living expenses to mortgage payments, thereby reducing the loan balance faster.

How to Buy a Foreclosed House: It’s a business — it’s an opportunity— it’s a risk

The way the media tells it, there are million of bargains out there that will be the house of your dreams and will make you rich. If it seems too good to be true, that would because it IS too good to be true. As a backdrop to this discussion remember that there are over 2 million homes that could be on the market but for the fact that the “owners” don’t want to flood the market. 2 million homes means there are too many homes for any foreseeable demand from buyers. That means that bargain prices are simply early predictors of where the market is heading. Those statistics, taken from over 500,000 homes reported and sampled, shows that the average “discount” is 15%-20%. In a normal market the discount would be real and relatively stable. In this market where we have 2 million homes already in the pipeline and around 3-4 million MORE homes coming it is not merely possible but rather likely that prices will continue to be depressed.

Add to that the credit crunch and the current environment where banks are reinstating underwriting standards where they verify the appraisal, verify your ability to pay, verify your history, verify other conditions affecting the value or future value of the home, and you have a seller’s glut with very little demand. Analysts from companies that maintain divisions employing economists now are estimating that it will take 6-12 years to clean up this mess. I think these estimates will change monthly until they give recognition to the fact that 10 years is about the best we could ever hope for, 30 years in about the worst case, and that the probable time will be something close to 20 years. That is 2 decades of confused downward price pressure, title errors, defects and defects, and figuring out how to undo the the chaos created by Wall Street.

That said, there are many reasons why you SHOULD buy a foreclosed home. First you SHOULD buy a home if you want to live in it — but beware that most people THINK they will live there a long time but frequently move within 3-5 years due to unforeseen circumstances. Financially, the likelihood that you will financially benefit from such circumstances is extremely low. Renting the same house or one just like it will probably cost no more than 60% of the monthly payment you would have even if you put 20% down payment. And you don’t get stuck trying to sell a house in a market that will basically be unchanged or worse than it is now.

Second you should buy a home on a short sale or otherwise, if you have capital and a good credit score and want to do something good. Let’s assume the house was originally bought for $450,000 and the buyer made a 20% down payment. So the buyer paid $90,000 PLUS all the improvements that are made, especially to a new developer tract house. So the sake of our example, the buyer now finds himself with a house that is currently “appraised” at $275,000. The “lender” refuses (actually lacks the authority because they are not really the lender) to modify the mortgage with a principal reduction, the terms are resetting so that the buyer’s payments are about to triple or have already done so. Assume they had no problem making the original teaser payments and could even pay more but not the absurd amounts called for under his current mortgage or deed of trust.

Let’s further assume the foreclosure has already taken place and the buyer is still in the home, awaiting eviction. With a little help from you and this post you get the homeowner to fight the eviction and start a confrontation where the homeowner is demanding discovery and is alleging a fraudulent foreclosure. Using average “discounts” you buy the house for $55,000 less than appraisal from the “bank” (actually a separate entity with dubious authority to have taken or retained title to the property since neither the forecloser nor the REO (Real Estate Owned) entity had one dime in funding the mortgage). So you have purchased the home for $220,000. Don’t get all excited. The original $450,000 price was false and even fraudulent. The next time that house sees $450,000 will be somewhere around the year 2040.

So now you make a down payment of 20% or $44,000. You have $44,000 into the deal plus whatever assistance you have the original buyer/homeowner. Your mortgage is $176,000. Using an amortization of 15 years fixed rate for 5%, your payments for principal, interest, taxes, utilities and insurance are probably going to be around $1250-$1350 per month. You give the original buyer/homeowner a lease requiring payments of $1600-$1700 per month plus a CPI (Consumer price index no less than 2% with no maximum) AND a pass through of increases in utilities, taxes etc. The lease is at least 5 years long. If you don’t have a homeowner willing to lease for 5 years, you are going to have trouble.

The lease is a net lease requiring the tenant to maintain the house. It renews automatically for additional terms of 5 years unless canceled with at no more than 9 months notice and no less than 6 months notice. Beginning with the end of the third year, the homeowners may have a two year option to buy the house at either the price you paid for the house, plus CPI or the current fair market value, whichever is higher. This option is good only in years 4 and 5.

You start negotiating with the “bank” or the REO with a demand for proof of title. See how-to-negotiate-a-modification

They will offer you indemnification, hold harmless and release. None of that means anything because most of them have either gone out of business or are about to go out of business. You ask “Who is the actual creditor here?” That will make them uncomfortable. You get rough and tough. And then you soften a little and use the procedure set forth below. Meanwhile the original buyer/homeowner starts threatening them because they obviously don’t have physical possession of the note or they have no rightful claim to ownership of it. The original buyer/homeowner makes demand and maybe even files suit demanding to know who the creditor is or was. This will soften up the game of the bank/REO.

Now let’s talk about how you are going to do this without being in the same mess that the banks, homeowners, title companies and others are in.

The attributes of a good solid purchase of a foreclosed home are:

  1. Warranty Deed
  2. Title Policy from large company without any exclusion relating to securitization of the prior owner’s loan. It would be best if the policy specifically mentioned securitization and stated affirmatively that there is no exception relating thereto.
  3. Friendly Quiet Title Action, in which the REO, the forecloser and all other known parties, at their expense bring a quiet title action naming the former buyer/homeowner and you, and naming John Does 1-1000 being the holder of mortgage backed securities who could have or who could claim an interest in the mortgage being extinguished by this deal. As long as the relief sought is ratification of the above deal and ordering the clerk of the County to remove the old mortgage and accept the new filings without any encumbrance other than your new mortgage and without any owner other than you.
  4. ONLY A FINAL JUDGMENT EXECUTED BY A JUDGE WILL GIVE YOU CLEAR TITLE. WAIT UNTIL THE TIME FOR APPEAL HAS RUN. INCLUDE A PROVISION WHEREIN YOU CAN RESCIND IF SOMEONE MAKES A CLAIM THAT THIS TRANSACTION WAS A FRAUD ON THE COURT WHETHER IT HAS MERIT OR NOT. IF SUCH A CLAIM IS MADE THEN AT YOUR OPTION YOU BECOME THE SUCCESSOR TO THE “BANK”  AND REO AND OTHER FORECLOSURE OR TRUSTEE SERVICES OR, AAT YOUR OPTION YOU CAN RESCIND THE TRANSACTION RECEIVING BACK ALL MONEY RECEIVED BY THE SELLING PARTIES TO THE TRANSACTION IN WHICH YOU PURCHASED THE PROPERTY.
  5. Indemnification from the forecloser
  6. Indemnification from the REO
  7. Hold Harmless from the Forecloser
  8. Hold Harmless from the REO
  9. General release from original buyer/homeowner
  10. Acknowledgment from your new lender that they were advised of the above and they agree that they will not make any claims against you for misrepresentation or misstatement based upon the securitization of the loan.
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