TILA Rescission and Bankruptcy: What Happens When the Bankruptcy Court Gets it Wrong

When TILA rescission has occurred the encumbrance is eliminated and the debt converts from one arising from a promissory note to one arising from a statute — 15 USC §1635. The debt then becomes subject to the statute of limitations for claims under TILA because the debt now arises under TILA. If the statute has run the debt is barred. Thus when the court gets it wrong and ignores the TILA Rescission it is warping the value of the bankruptcy estate as well as allowing secured status to unsecured creditors.

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THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A LEGAL OPINION UPON WHICH YOU CAN RELY IN ANY INDIVIDUAL CASE. HIRE A LAWYER.
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The motions for reopening cases in bankruptcy based upon error in ignoring TILA Rescission generally fail to drill home the fact that the error causes the entire bankruptcy estate to be valued incorrectly.

I think the motion is missing something — the effect on the BKR estate that has been overlooked. By virtue of 15 USC §1635 the original loan contract has, by operation of law, been replaced with a statutorily imposed new agreement, the terms of which are spelled out in the statute.

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This means, as per the statute and REG Z which must be read along with the statute, that the note is replaced by a new obligation and the mortgage has been eliminated — all by the express wording of the statute “by operation of law.” Hence the obligation to repay continues as an enforceable liability provided that the claimant satisfies the conditions precedent set forth in the statute. But that obligation is no longer secured — for the express purposes of allowing the borrower to seek new financing from which the obligation could be repaid.
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The parties claiming to be owners of the debt or claiming to be representatives of the owner of the debt failed to comply with their obligations under the new agreement. Hence any right to enforce the obligation became inchoate. That failure was not in any way caused by the borrower.
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The obligation arises not from the original loan agreement but from the statutorily imposed obligation that replaced the original loan agreement. The statute is part of the Federal Truth in Lending Act (TILA). Claims under TILA are barred by the statute of limitations contained within that act.
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Hence the obligation was wrongfully treated as secured when it had been converted to unsecured by the statute. And the obligation itself is now barred by the statute of limitations.
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The effect on the bankruptcy estate is obvious — any claimants under the original loan agreement are moved from secured to unsecured and, since they no longer have the benefit of the written instruments (the void note and mortgage) they must establish their claim by filing a proof of claim in which they establish ownership of the obligation and thereby establish that the they hold the risk of pecuniary loss, without which they cannot be paid.
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No party has established ownership of the statutorily imposed obligation. The time for pressing such a claim is now barred by the statute of limitations.
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Hence the value of the estate that was overlooked is understated by the fair market value of the property that is now unsecured and the liabilities of the petitioner are overstated by whatever amount was erroneously claimed by the claimants.
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These effects change the entire picture of the estate having an undeniable effect on all creditors and the petitioner. The court erred in ignoring these indisputable facts and laws thus casting the estate in an entirely erroneous light. This can only be corrected by re-opening the case and entering orders consistent with the true facts and applicable laws.

RESCISSION: When the Judge Gets it Wrong

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Our services consist mainly of the following:
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  3. Case review and analysis
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THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE IS NOT A LEGAL OPINION UPON WHICH YOU CAN RELY IN ANY INDIVIDUAL CASE. HIRE A LAWYER.

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Based upon my own experience and what has been reported to me from around the country, most trial judges are making the mistake of confusing argument and facts when it comes to TILA Rescission. They are either expressly or tacitly ruling that at best, TILA Rescission is a claim or defense — which means that in order for Rescission to have any effect, it must be litigated. This is wrong and it has been expressly rejected by both the TILA Rescission Statute, and U. S. Supreme  Court in the Jesinoski decision.
I offer the following, drafted by me, as a response to when Court’s essentially overrule the the highest and final court in the land. I suspect that the resistance by trial judges to the effects of rescission will not be resolved, in most instances, without an appellate court saying for the second time that Courts are wrong when they disregard or try to change the wording of the TILA Rescission statute.
Comments are welcome: neilfgarfield@hotmail.com

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Motion for Reconsideration on Defendant’’s Motion to Dismiss For Lack of Subject Matter Jurisdiction
  1. A trial Court has the inherent authority to control its own interlocutory orders prior to Final Judgment. North Shore Hospital Inc. v Barber 143 SO 2d 849, 850 (Fla 1962).
  2. While non-final orders were not subject to a motion for rehearing, a trial judge nevertheless had the discretion to choose to entertain such a motion precisely because it had jurisdiction to control its non-final orders prior to entry of Judgment. Commercial Garden Mall v Success Academy Inc. 57 So 3rd 982 (Fla 2nd DCA 2011).
  3. An order denying a Motion to Dismiss is interlocutory. See Nationwide Ins Co. of Florida v Demo 57 So 3d 982 (Fla 2nd DCA 2011.
  4. Here this Court heard Defendant’s Motion to Dismiss on March 10, 2016 and denied, apparently without prejudice to raise the issue of rescission as a defense, Defendant’s Motion to Dismiss for lack of subject matter jurisdiction.
  5. TILA Rescission is neither a claim nor a defense. It is a legal act that has legal effect when completed. The only factual issues are whether the rescission was sent, which in this case is undisputed. TILA Rescission is effective as a matter of law, when mailed. Its effect is to void the note and void the mortgage and trigger specific statutory duties of the “lender” under 15 U.S.C. §1635 et seq. Jesinoski v Countrywide  574 U.S. ___ (2015) and Regulation Z. C.F.R. (Federal Reserve as succeeded by Consumer Financial Protection Board).
  6. The gravamen of what was argued before the Court was that the note and mortgage, being void by operation of law, could not be the subject of any legal action.
  7. Since the Plaintiff’s entire case rested on the use of two void instruments — the note and mortgage — and there is no allegation in the Plaintiff’s complaint asserting legal standing of an creditor seeking to collect on a debt, the Court does not have any justiciable issue before it. There is no count in Plaintiff’s complaint that seeks to recover on a debt, naming as Plaintiff the owner of the debt. In this case Plaintiff admits the Creditor (owner of the debt) is not the Plaintiff. The complaint seeks solely to enforce the paper instruments — the note and/or mortgage — both of which are now void by operation of law.
  8. There is also no lawsuit by any real party in interest seeking to vacate the rescission that has indisputably been sent, received and recorded in the County records — and which has been indisputably ruled as legally effective by the U.S. Supreme Court.
  9. At the hearing it was admitted by that the owner of the debt was the “investor” who was distinguished from the Trust.
  10. The rescission that was indisputably mailed and received removes standing of the putative Plaintiff. Without the note and mortgage, only the debt remains. And the only party with standing to seek collection on the debt is the Investor, who is not party to the instant action. And according to the TILA Rescission statute such a “creditor” must either first FULLY comply with the TILA Rescission statutory duties or first file a lawsuit to vacate the rescission (which currently has the same force and effect as an order of any court of competent jurisdiction).
  11. No lawsuit demanding that the Court vacate the rescission has been filed by anyone. Yet this Court has effectively granted such relief without any real party in interest, without a lawsuit seeking to vacate the rescission sent by borrower, and without any pleading in which a [proper party seeks to remove the recorded rescission that was filed in the County records. This Court instead is ignoring the rescission as though it does not have any legal effect despite the clear pronouncements of the TILA Rescission Statute, Regulation Z, and the clear and final ruling by a unanimous Supreme Court of the United States.
  12. Plaintiff lacks standing even if Defendant’s defenses based upon an untimely fabricated assignment are over-ruled.
  13. Defendants assert that this Court misapprehended argument and facts.
  14. The undisputed facts are that the TILA rescission was sent and received. The fact remains now that the rescission is effective and remains effective as a matter of law. The undisputed facts, as a matter of law, remain that the note and mortgage were both rendered void by operation of law by the sending of a letter of rescission by the alleged “borrower.”
  15. The Court’s decision was that the issue of the effectiveness of the rescission was a defense and not the proper subject of a Motion to Dismiss for lack of jurisdiction.
  16. The error asserted by Defendants is that this Court’s ruling essentially “over-rules” the Supreme Court of the United States in Jesinoski v Countrywide, a copy of which was provided to the Court  at the hearing. Defendants state the obvious: this court lacks authority to overrule the highest court in the land.
  17. To hold that rescission is a defense to be litigated flies in the face of the unanimous Supreme Court ruling that NO LITIGATION is required to make rescission effective. No Lawsuit is required. Jesinoski, Supra.
  18. Rescission is effective by operation of law. 15 U.S.C. §1635, Regulation Z. Jesinoski Supra — all of which state that rescission is effective as a matter of law when mailed and that no claim or lawsuit or ruling by any court is required by the borrower to make it effective.
  19. The effect of this Court’s ruling is to over-rule the Supreme Court of the United States and rewrite the TILA rescission statute that is a very clear and specific remedy WITHOUT  THE NECESSITY OF THE BORROWER RAISING THE ISSUE IN LITIGATION. The entire point of the TILA Rescission statute was to prevent “lenders’ from stonewalling the effect of the rescission. The rescission is immediately effective as a matter of law, when mailed.
  20. By ruling otherwise, this Court is following a rule of law explicitly rejected by the U.S. Supreme Court.
  21. This Court is following a rule of law that has been expressly repudiated by the highest and final court in the land. The effect of this Court’s ruling is to make the rescission NOT EFFECTIVE until it is raised in defense of a foreclosure and then only after the effectiveness of there rescission is litigated in a lawsuit. The U.S. Supreme Court says otherwise in a unanimous decision penned by the late Antonin Scalia.
  22. In the Jesinoski decision it was stated clearly and unequivocally that the rescission, whether disputed or not, IS effective upon mailing, without any further action on the part of the borrower. The burden of disputing (pleading and proving standing and a cause of action to vacate the rescission) falls solely and squarely on the parties who received the notice of rescission.
  23. The Jesinoski Court further explicitly stated that hundreds of trial and appellate courts across the land were wrong when they had previously ruled, as this court has just done, that the rescission was subject to litigation and that the “borrower” must bring a legal claim or lawsuit seeking to make the TILA Rescission effective..
  24. The Defendants assert that this Court’s apparent unfamiliarity with the Jesinoski decision, the TILA Rescission Statute and Regulation Z, combined with the Court’s understanding of common law rescission resulted in an erroneous ruling that was expressly and explicitly ruled out by the Supreme Court of the Untied States. This court may not read in the rules of common law rescission to a specific statutory scheme that is clear on its face.
  25. It is clear that the the Supreme Court of the United States has decided, as the Final Authority, that the TILA rescission statute is clear and unambiguous on its face, thus eliminating any right, authority or jurisdiction to read into or interpret the TILA Rescission statute. It is equally clear from the express wording of the Jesinoski decision that reading in common law rules of rescission is erroneous, as such “interpretation” was rejected by a unanimous Supreme Court as unlawful and wrong.
  26. There is no escaping the fact that the rescission is effective by operation of law.
  27. Accordingly, Defendants assert that this court has no room for interpretation or authority or jurisdiction to change or interpret the TILA rescission statute such that the borrower must raise rescission as a defense — a requirement that unlawfully denies the effectiveness of the rescission when mailed.
  28. Accordingly Defendants assert that this Court committed error by ruling that rescission was a defense requiring pleading and proof in order for the rescission to be effective as a matter of law. Defendants thus request this Court revisit the issue and correct its prior ruling.

Rescission Summary As I see It

If you read my blog for the last 3 weeks or so you should get a good idea of where I am coming from on this. If you still have questions or need assistance call me at 954-495-9867 or 520-405-1688. The basic thrust of my argument is that

  1. BOTH Congress and US Supreme Court agree that there is nothing left for the borrower to do other than dropping notice of rescission in the mail. It is EFFECTIVE BY OPERATION OF LAW at the point of mailing. The whole point is that you don’t need to be or have a lawyer in order to cancel the loan contract, the note and the mortgage (deed of trust) with the same force as if a Judge ordered it. No lawsuit, no proof is required from the borrower. No tender is required as it would be in common law rescission. The money for payoff of the old debt is presumed to come from a new lender that approves a 1st Mortgage loan without fear that they will lose their priority position.
  2. Lender(s) must comply within 20 days — return canceled note, satisfy mortgage, and return money to borrower.
  3. Lenders MUST file a lawsuit challenging the rescission within 20 days or their defenses are waived. Any other interpretation would make the rescission contingent, which is the opposite of what TILA and Scalia say is the case.
  4. Therefore a lawsuit by borrower to enforce the rescission need only prove mailing.
  5. Any attempt to bring up statute of limitations or other defenses are barred by 20 day window.
  6. The clear reason for this unusual statutory scheme is to allow borrower to cancel the old transaction and replace with a new loan. This can only happen if the rescission is ABSOLUTE. It can be declared void or irregular or barred or anything else ONLY within the 20 day window. If the 20 day window was not final (like counting the days for filing notice of appeal appeal, motion for re-hearing, etc.) then no new lender or bank would fund a loan that could be later knocked out of first priority position in the chain of title because the rescission was found to be faulty in some way. This is the opposite of what TILA and Scalia say.
  7. The content of the rescission notice should be short — I hereby cancel/rescind the loan referenced above. You merely reference the loan number, recording information etc. at which point the note and mortgage become VOID by operation of law.
  8. BY OPERATION OF LAW means that the only way it can be avoided is by getting a court order.
  9. If any court were to allow “defense” in a rescission enforcement action AFTER the 20 day window the goal of allowing the borrower to get another loan to pay off the old lender(s) would be impossible.
  10. Hence the ONLY possible logical conclusion is that they MUST file the action within 20 days or lose the opportunity to challenge the rescission. And any possible defenses are waived if not filed during that period of time. That action by the “lender” or “creditor” must be an equitable action to set aside the rescission, which is already “effective” by operation of law.

The worst case scenario would be that rescission is the most effective discovery tool available. If the lender(s) file the 20 day action they would need to establish their positions as creditors WITHOUT the note and mortgage (which are ALREADY VOID). This would require proof of payment and proof of economic interest and proof of ownership and balance. Any failure to plead these things would fail to establish standing. The attempt to use the note and mortgage as proof or the basis of pleading should be dismissed easily. The note and mortgage are void by operation of law by the time the bank or servicer files its action.

In all probability the only parties who actually have an interest in the debt are clueless investors who by contract have waived their right to enforce or participate in the collection process. The problem THEY have is they gave their money to a securities broker. They can neither show nor even allege that they know what happened to their money after they gave it to the broker.

The important thing about TILA Rescission is that it is a virtual certainty that the borrower will be required to file an enforcement action. In that action they should not allow themselves to get sucked into an argument over whether the rescission was correct, fair, barred by limitations or anything else, all of which should have been raised within the 20 day window. AND that recognition is the reason why we have been inundated to prepare pre-litigation packages, analysis and reports to assist lawyers in filing actions to enforce rescissions, whether filed today or ten years ago.

Caveat: I have no doubt that attempts will be made to change the law. The Supreme Court has made changing the law impossible by a ruling from the bench, That means state legislatures and Congress are going to be under intense pressure to change this law or the effect of it. But as it stands now, I don’t think any other analysis covers all the bases like the one expressed here.

Reverse Redlining: Targeting the Poor and the Unsophisticated for High Risk Mortgages

For further information please call 954-495-9867 or 520-405-1688

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see https://www.aclu.org/sites/default/files/assets/aclumfy_mortgage_report.pdf

At this point it is clear that the banks actually targeted people of color and other demographics where the likelihood of “default” on a loan was extraordinarily high. The ACLU in its latest report on the mortgage crisis proves this to any remaining doubters. This report also shows that these disadvantaged groups are the least likely to get a modification or other settlement or assistance of the various mortgage issues that we all know now were pandemic throughout the period of 1996-present.

But what they are missing is an answer to the REAL question: Why would anyone target a demographic where “defaults” could be claimed in much higher proportion to the history in the general population? Why did they want the loans to fail, because “failure” of the loan was a basic assumption to anyone who understands the various iterations of highly complex and sophisticated loan products — a number which climbed from 5 in the 1970’s to 450 in 2008. Imagine that 450 different loan options offered to the poor, the people who don’t speak or understand English very well and the people who are poor enough that eventually when payments reset they will not pay and they won’t be able to fight for their house. The tragedy here, let me remind everyone, is that most of these were refinancing of existing home ownership — that’s right, most of the homes were in the family for generations.

The Banks targeted homes where the home values were low. Then they drove the prices up to many items the actual value by filling the bathtub with money and selling “payments” instead of principal or interest rate. They offered teaser payments that the homeowner could afford — but which changed to a monthly payment that was higher (sometimes a multiple) than the entire household income. Somehow the Banks have convinced courts to think that the disclosures were sufficient. They were not. And in my opinion if the courts would scrutinize these so-called loans the way they did before securitization none of the loans would survive any fair interpretation of disclosures required under Federal laws (TILA) and state laws, including common law.

Banks do economic analysis every day employing thousands of analysts. Those analysts knew that the prices were being driven above the value of the property, knew that the endgame was the drop of prices to resume relationship with values, and thus knew — because they rigged the game — that if they bet the mortgages would fail, they would make a lot of money. The trick was to lose somebody else’s money not their own. and that is what they did.

If the ACLU wants to do something that produces actual results, they should analyze the economics of the alleged securitization of these loans. What they will find is a note that cannot be enforced and a mortgage that was void from the start. They will find fraud with aggravating circumstances. the banks needed really “bad” loans in order to accomplish their goals. By using investor funds instead of their own, they could claim ownership of the loans when they reported their assets and liabilities to regulatory authorities; but they would assign the losses to investors, borrowers, insurers, guarantors, FDIC loss sharing, and credit default swap counterparties and take the proceeds for themselves — even though they had no losses.

The ACLU should bring actions on behalf of the demographics hit hardest by this Ponzi scheme. They should state the obvious — that the true source of funds had no idea how their money was being used, the banks that did know were intentionally creating bloated loan documents based upon fraudulent appraisals, and the real creditors were deprived of any protection for their investment while the borrowers were signing documents that recited fraudulent information as to the identity of the lender and the real cost of the loan.

The attack on enforceability of the mortgages is easiest simply because it is now fairly easy to show unclean hands. Where a loan is statutorily defined as “predatory per se” it is hard to argue for the banks that it isn’t subject to “unclean hands per se” and therefore cannot be enforced because it is against public policy.

In a court where rules of equity are applied, there is no enforcement of a deal that was, from the start, violation of Federal and State law, was “predatory per se” (Regulation Z) and was part of a fraudulent scheme. This scheme only works for the banks if the loan is secured by a mortgage on the property. That mortgage is mostly unenforceable and probably void, ab initio. True creditors can prove they lost money on the deal have an opportunity to sue and collect on money due them — (1)  from the borrower up to perhaps the amount that should have been the principal, and (2) from the banks for the rest of the money that was skimmed off the top. The amount skimmed in many cases especially in the disadvantaged demographics, was frequently more than the loan itself.

Two Different Worlds — Note and Mortgage

Further information please call 954-495-9867 or 520-405-1688

No radio show tonight because of birthday celebration — I’m 68 and still doing this

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The enforcement of promissory notes lies within the context of the marketplace for currency and currency equivalents. The enforcement of mortgages on real property lies within the the context of the marketplace for real estate transactions. While certainty is the aim of public policy in those two markets, the rules are different and should not be ignored.

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see http://www.uniformlaws.org/Shared/Committees_Materials/PEBUCC/PEB_Report_111411.pdf

This article is not a substitute for getting advice from an attorney licensed to practice in the jurisdiction in which your property is or was located.

Back in 2008 I had some correspondence and telephone conversations with an attorney in Chicago, Robert Wutscher when I was writing about the reality of the way in which banks were doing  what they called “securitization of mortgages.” Of course then they were denying that there were any trusts, denying that any transfers occurred and were suing in the name of the originator or MERS or anyone but the party who actually had their money used in loan transactions.  It wasn’t done the right way because the obvious intent was to play a shell game in which the banks would emerge as the apparent principal party in interest under the illusion created by certain presumptions attendant to being the “holder” of a note. For each question I asked him he replied that Aurora in that case was the “holder.” No matter what the question was, he replied “we’re the holder.” I still have the letter he sent which also ignored the rescission from the homeowner whose case I was inquiring about for this blog.

He was right that the banks would be able to bend the law on rescission at the level of the trial courts because Judges just didn’t like TILA rescission. I knew that in the end he would lose on that proposition eventually and he did when Justice Scalia, in a terse opinion, simply told us that Judges and Justices were wrong in all those trial court decisions and even appellate court decisions that applied common law theories to modify the language of the Federal Law (TILA) on rescission. And now bank lawyers are facing the potential consequences of receiving notices of TILA rescission where the bank simply ignored them instead of preserving the rights of the “lender” by filing a declaratory action within 20 days of the rescission. By operation of law, the note and mortgage were nullified, ab initio. Which means that any further activity based upon the note and mortgage was void. And THAT means that the foreclosures were void.

Is discussing the issue of the “holder” with lawyers and even doing a tour of seminars I found that the confusion that was apparent for lay people was also apparent in lawyers. They looked at the transaction and the rights to enforce as one single instrument that everyone called “the mortgage.” They looked at me like I had three heads when I said, no, there are three parts to every one of these illusory transactions and the banks fail outright on two of them.

The three parts are the debt, the note and the mortgage. The debt arises when the borrower receives money. The presumption is that it is a loan and that the borrower owes the money back. it isn’t a gift. There should be no “free house” discussion here because we are talking about money, not what was done with the money. Only a purchase money mortgage loan involves the house and TILA recognizes that. Some of the rules are different for those loans. But most of the loans were not purchase money mortgages in that they were either refinancing, or combined loans of 1st mortgage plus HELOC. In fact it appears that ultimately nearly all the outstanding loans fall into the category of refinancing or the combined loan and HELOC (Home Equity Line of Credit that exactly matches the total loan requirements of the transaction (including the purchase of the home).

The debt arises by operation of law in favor of the party who loaned the money. The banks diverged from the obvious and well-established practice of the lender being the same party as the party named on the note as payee and on the mortgage as mortgagee (or beneficiary under a Deed of Trust). The banks did this through a process known as “Table Funded Loans” in which the real lender is concealed from the borrower. And they did this through agreements frequently called “Assignment and Assumption” Agreements, which by contract called for both parties (the originator and the aggregator to violate the laws governing disclosure (TILA and frequently state law) which means by definition that the contract called for an illegal act that is by definition a contract in contravention of public policy.

A loan contract is created by operation of law in which the borrower is obligated to pay back the loan to the source of the funds with or without a written instrument. If the loan contract (comprised of offer, acceptance and consideration) does not exist, then there is nothing to enforce at law although it is possible to still force the borrower to repay the money to the actual source of funds through a suit in equity — mainly unjust enrichment. The banks, through their lawyers, argue that the Federal disclosure requirements should be ignored. I think it is pretty clear that Justice Scalia and a unanimous United States Supreme Court think that argument stinks. It is the bank’s argument that should be ignored, not the law.

Congress passed TILA specifically to protect consumers of financial products (loans) from the overly burdensome and overly complex nature of loan documents. This argument about what is important and what isn’t has already been addressed in Congress and signed into law against the banks’ position that it doesn’t matter whether they really follow the law and disclose all the parties involved in the transaction, the true identity of the lender, the compensation of all the parties that made money as a result of the origination of the loan transaction. Regulation Z states that a pattern of behavior (more than 5) in which loans are table funded (disclosure of real lender withheld from borrower) is PREDATORY PER SE.

If it is predatory per se then there are remedies available to the borrower which potentially include treble damages, attorneys fees etc. Equally important if not more so is that a transaction, whether illusory or real, that is predatory per se, is therefore against public policy and the party seeking to enforce an otherwise enforceable document cannot do so because of the doctrine of unclean hands. In fact, if the transaction is predatory per se, it is dirty hands per se. And this is where Judges get stuck and so do many lawyers. The outcome of that unavoidable analysis is, they say, a free house. And their remedy is to give the party with unclean hands a free house (because they paid nothing for the origination or acquisition of the loan). I think the Supreme Court will not look kindly upon this “legislating from the bench.” And I think the Court has already signaled its intent to hold everyone to the strict construction of TILA and Regulation Z.

So there are two reason the debt can’t be enforced the way the banks want. (1) There is no loan contract because the source of the money and the borrower never agreed to anything and neither one knew about the other. (2) the mortgage cannot be enforced because it is an action in equity and the shell game of parties tossing the paperwork around all have unclean hands. And there is a third reason as well — while the note might be enforceable based merely on an endorsement, the mortgage is not enforceable unless the enforcer paid for it (Article 9, UCC).

And THAT is where the confusion really starts — which bank lawyers depend on every time they go to court. Bank lawyers add to the confusion by using the tired phrase of “the note follows the mortgage and the mortgage follows the note.” At one time this was a completely true presumption backed up by real facts. But now the banks are asking the courts to apply the presumption even when the courts actually know that the facts presumed by the legal presumption are untrue.

Notes and mortgages exist in two different marketplaces or different worlds, if you like. Public policy insists that notes that are intended to be negotiable remain negotiable and raise certain presumptions. The holder of a note might very well be able to sue and win a judgment ON THE NOTE. And the judgment holder might be able to record a judgment lien and foreclose on it subject to homestead exemptions.

But it isn’t as simple as the banks make it out to be.

If someone pays for the note in good faith and without knowledge of the borrower’s defenses when the note is not in default, THAT holder can enforce the note against the signor or maker of the note regardless of lack of consideration or anything else unless there is a provable defense of fraud and perhaps conspiracy. But any other holder steps into the shoes of the original lender. And if there was no consummated loan contract between the payee on the note and the borrower because the payee never loaned any money to the borrower, then the holder might have standing to sue but they don’t have the evidence to win the suit. The borrower still owes the money to whoever was the source, but the “holder” of the note doesn’t get a judgment. There is a difference between standing to sue and a prima facie case needed to win. Otherwise everyone would get one of those mechanical forging machines and sign the name of someone with money and sue them on a note they never signed. Or they would promise to loan money, get the signed note and then not complete the loan contract by making the loan.

So public policy demands that there be reasonable certainty in the negotiation of unqualified promises to pay. BUT public policy expressed in the UCC Article 9 says that if you want to enforce a mortgage you must not only have some indication that it was transferred to you, you must also have paid valuable consideration for the mortgage.

Without proof of payment, there is no prima facie case for enforcement of the mortgage, but it does curiously remain on the chain of title of the property (public records) unless nullified by the fact that the mortgage was executed as collateral for the note which was NOT a true representation of the loan contract based upon the real debt that arose by operation of law. The public policy is preserve the integrity of public records in the real estate marketplace. That is the only way to have reasonable certainty of title and encumbrances.

Forfeiture, an equitable remedy, must be done with clean hands based upon a real interest in the alleged default — not just a pile of paper that grows each year as banks try to convert an assignment of mortgage into a substitute for consideration.

Hence being the “holder” might mean you have the right to sue on the note but without being a holder in due course or otherwise paying fro the mortgage, there is no automatic basis for enforcing the mortgage in favor of a party with no economic interest in the mortgage.

see also http://knowltonlaw.com/james-knowlton-blog/ucc-article-3-and-mortgage-backed-securities.html

Deny and Discover Strategy Working

For representation in South Florida, where I am both licensed and familiar with the courts and Judges, call 520-405-1688. If you live in another state we provide direct support to attorneys. call the same number.

Having watched botched cases work their way to losing conclusions and knowing there is a better way, I have been getting more involved in individual cases — pleading, memos, motions, strategies and tactics — and we are already seeing some good results. Getting into discovery levels the playing field and forces the other side to put up or shut up. Since they can’t put up, they must shut up.

If you start with the premise that the original mortgage was defective for the primary reason that it was unfunded by the payee on the note, the party identified as “Lender” or the mortgagee or beneficiary, we are denying the transaction, denying the signature where possible (or pleading that the signature was procured by fraud), and thus denying that any “transfer” afterwards could not have conveyed any more than what the “originator” had, which is nothing.

This is not a new concept. Investors are suing the investment banks saying exactly what we have been saying on these pages — that the origination process was fatally defective, the notes and mortgages unenforceable and the predatory lending practices lowering the value of even being a “lender.”

We’ve see hostile judges turn on the banks and rule for the homeowner thus getting past motions to lift stay, motions to dismiss and motions for summary judgment in the last week.

The best line we have been using is “Judge, if you were lending the money wouldn’t you want YOUR name on the note and mortgage?” Getting the wire transfer instructions often is the kiss of death for the banks because the originator of the wire transfer is not the payee and the instructions do not say that this is for benefit of the “originator.”

As far as I can tell there is no legal definition of “originator.” It is one step DOWN from mortgage broker whose name should also not be on the note or mortgage. An originator is a salesman, and if you look behind the scenes at SEC filings or other regulatory filings you will see your “lender” identified not as a lender, which is what they told you, but as an originator. That means they were a placeholder or nominee just like the MERS situation.

TILA and Regulation Z make it clear that even if there was nexus of connection between the source of funds and the originator, it would till be an improper predatory table-funded loan where the borrower was denied the disclosure and information to know and choose the source of a loan, thus enabling consumers to shop around.

In order of importance, we are demanding through subpoena duces tecum, that parties involved in the fake securitization chain come for examination of the wire transfer, check, ACH or other money transfer showing the original funding of the loan and any other money transactions in which the loan was involved INCLUDING but not limited to transactions with or for the fake pool of mortgages that seems to always be empty with no bank account, no trustee account, and no actual trustee with any powers. These transactions don’t exist. The red herring is that the money showed up at closing which led everyone to the mistaken conclusion that the originator made the loan.

Second we ask for the accounting records showing the establishment on the books and records of the originator, and any assignees, of a loan receivable together with the name and address of the bookkeeper and the auditing firm for that entity. No such entries exist because the loan receivable was converted into a bond receivable, but he bond was worthless because it was based on an empty pool.

And third we ask for the documentation, correspondence and all other communications between the originator and the closing agent and between each “assignor” and “assignee” which, as we have seen they are only too happy to fabricate and produce. But the documentation is NOT supported by underlying transactions where money exchanged hands.

The net goals are to attack the mortgage as not having been perfected because the transaction was and remains incomplete as recited in the note, mortgage and other “closing” documents. The “lender” never fulfilled their part of the bargain — loaning the money. Hence the mortgage secures an obligation that does not exist. The note is then attacked as being fatally defective partly because the names were used as nominees leaving the borrower with nobody to talk to about the loan status — there being a nominee payee, nominee lender, and nominee mortgagee or beneficiary.

The other part, just as serious is that the terms of repayment on the note do NOT match up to the terms agreed upon with the institutional investors that purchased mortgage bonds to which the borrower was NOT a party and did not issue. Hence the basic tenets of contract law — offer, acceptance and consideration are all missing.

The Deny and Discover strategy is better because it attacks the root of the transaction and enables the borrower to deny everything the forecloser is trying to put over on the Court with the appearance of reality but nothing to back it up.

The attacks on the foreclosers based upon faulty or fraudulent or even forged documentation make for interesting reading but if in the final analysis the borrower is admitting the loan, admitting the note and mortgage, admitting the default then all the other stuff leads a Judge to conclude that there is error in the ways of the banks but no harm because they were entitled to foreclose anyway.

People are getting on board with this strategy and they have the support from an unlikely source — the investors who thought they were purchasing mortgage bonds with value instead of a sham bond based upon an empty pool with no money and no assets and no loans. Their allegation of damages is based upon the fact that despite the provisions of the pooling and servicing agreement, the prospectus and their reasonable expectations, that the closings were defective, the underwriting was defective and that there is no way to legally enforce the notes and mortgages, notwithstanding the fact that so many foreclosures have been allowed to proceed.

Call 520-405-1688 for customer service and you will get guidance on how to get help.

  1. Do we agree that creditors should be paid only once?
  2. Do we agree that pretending to borrow money for mortgages sand then using it at the race track is wrong?
  3. Do we agree that if the lender and the borrower sign two different documents each containing different terms, they don’t have a deal?
  4. Can we agree that if you were lending money you would want your name on the note and mortgage and not someone else’s?
  5. Can we agree that banks who loaned nothing and bought nothing should be worth nothing when the chips are counted in mortgage assets?

 

ILLLINOIS: RESCISSION REVIVED WITH DAMAGES!!!!

COMBO Title and Securitization Search, Report, Documents, Analysis & Commentary COMBO TITLE AND SECURITIZATION SEARCH, REPORT, ANALYSIS ON LUMINAQ

3.16.2011 Illinois Recission Stewart-v-BAC-w

EDITOR’S NOTE: THIS CASE STANDS FOR THE PROPOSITION THAT YOU CAN’T TELL THE BORROWER LATER WHAT SHOULD HAVE BEEN DISCLOSED AT CLOSING: Federal Law has governed these fake securitized loan transactions from their beginning. That is why they are fatally defective and the law provides a remedy. The most important remedy is rescission which operates as a matter of law and is NOT subject to a letter of rejection by the creditor. This case shows the efforts made by Bank of America to hide the creditor and then take the position that the rescission notice was not sent to the creditor. This Judge recognizes that ploy and rejects it.

PRACTICE NOTE: TWO STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS ARE AT WORK HERE. THE FIRST BEING THE TIME IN WHICH YOU CAN SEND NOTICE OF THE RESCISSION AND THE SECOND BEING THE TIME IN WHICH YOU CAN BRING AN ACTION TO ENFORCE THE RESCISSION. MANY PEOPLE SENT RESCISSION LETTERS ONLY TO HAVE THEM “REJECTED”. THOSE PEOPLE MIGHT OWN THEIR HOUSE FREE AND CLEAR BY OPERATION OF LAW AS PER TILA AND REG Z, WHICH MEANS THAT ANYTHING THAT HAPPENED AFTERWARD, IS A NULLITY (INCLUDING FORECLOSURE). THIS IS ONE OF THE HIDDEN FATAL DEFECTS IN THE CHAIN OF TITLE IN SECURITIZED LOANS. BOTH DISTRESSED AND NON-DISTRESSED LOANS HAVE BEEN RESCINDED. LAWYERS: THERE IS A WHOLE MARKETPLACE OF HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE WHO CAN ENFORCE THEIR RIGHT TO OWN THEIR HOME EVEN IF THEY WERE KICKED OUT YEARS AGO.

You must remember that it is only after the creditor complies with the rescission that the borrower has any obligation to tender anything back. The goal, as stated in this decision, is to put the borrower back in the position they were in before the lenders violated the law and violated the borrower’s rights to disclosure. Since disclosure was not complete until years after the closing, the three year extension on the right to rescind was tolled, allowing the three years to START running AFTER the disclosure was made. In this case the details of the actual transaction were withheld, thus entitling the borrower to rescind 6 years after closing.

BORROWER DOES NOT LOSE THE HOUSE IN RESCISSION UNLESS THEY WANT TO LOSE IT: You must also remember that it is only after the mortgage is taken off the record (after the loan security is extinguished) and after the lender returns all payments made by the borrower in connection with the closing whether those payments were made to the lender or third parties, that the borrower must tender something back — and according to at least some case law, the tender it is ONLY money and that amount and timing of payments are subject to the claims of the borrower for damages, and a reasonable payout period, the payment being unsecured and therefore dischargeable in bankruptcy.

NOTABLE QUOTES:

Stewart asserts that Home 123 committed two disclosure violations during the refinance closing: (1) it failed to provide two copies of the NORTC and (2) it failed to provide a complete TILDS. Although this claim alleges violations by Home 123, the claim is currently against Deutsche Bank based on its status as the assignee of Home 123.”

BAC received notice, did not respond within 20 days, and then refused to rescind the transaction. Deutsche Bank’s involvement is less clear, but Stewart alleged sufficient facts to proceed with her case under the theory that BAC either forwarded the notice to Deutsche Bank or acted as its agent in the transaction. This is a reasonable inference given that BAC, the loan servicer, actually responded to the rescission notice and refused it without referring to whether the assignee, Deutsche Bank, assented to the decision. BAC, Deutsche Bank, or both refused to rescind the transaction and discovery is necessary to sort out who is responsible for the decision to deny the rescission.”

“The complaint has three core claims. First, Stewart claims that Home 123 violated TILA by failing to provide her with the NORTC and a complete TILDS. For this “failure to disclose” claim, Stewart seeks statutory damages of $4,000 from Deutsche Bank as Home 123’s assignee. (Doc. 1, Prayer for Relief.) Second, Stewart seeks recession of the loan based on this disclosure violation. For this “loan rescission” claim, Stewart seeks a judgment forcing Defendants to void the loan and return her to the position she occupied before entering into the mortgage. (Id.) Third, Stewart alleges that Defendants failed to honor her election to rescind, which is itself a violation of TILA. For this “failure to honor rescission” claim, Stewart seeks actual damages and statutory damages of $4,000 from Defendants. As an additional remedy for all three claims, Stewart seeks an order requiring Defendants to delete all adverse credit information relating to the loan. (Id.)”

Only creditors and assignees are subject to liability under TILA. See 15 U.S.C. §§ 1640, 1641(a). Stewart acknowledges that MERS is not a creditor or assignee. (See Doc. 15 at 4).[1] Therefore, MERS is not subject to damages under TILA and Stewarts’ failure to disclose and failure to honor rescission damages claims against MERS are dismissed. See 15 U.S.C. §§ 1640, 1641(a); see also Horton v. Country Mortg. Servs., Inc., No. 07 C 6530, 2010 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 67, at *3 (N.D. Ill. Jan 4, 2010) (granting summary judgment to MERS because the plaintiff provided no evidence that MERS was a creditor or assignee)”

Because Stewart alleges, albeit generally, that MERS may be necessary to get her back to that status quo if her rescission is enforced by the Court, MERS cannot be dismissed entirely at this time. Rather, Stewart’s rescission claim stands as to MERS.”

“As to defendant BAC, TILA expressly disclaims liability for servicers “unless the servicer is or was the owner of the obligation.” 15 U.S.C. § 1641(f)(1). Stewart alleges that BAC “has an interest” in the loan and, as a result, is subject to liability. (Compl. ¶ 7.) While Stewart does not provide any specifics on how a loan servicer gained an interest in the loan, on a motion to dismiss, the Court must accept this allegation as true. See Tamayo, 526 F.3d at 1081. Even if the Court could ignore this allegation, BAC must remain a defendant in any event. The pleadings reveal that the January 26 letter refusing Stewart’s rescission was sent by BAC, not Deutsche Bank. BAC is a necessary defendant on the failure to honor rescission claim because it is not clear whether BAC independently refused rescission, refused as an agent of Deutsche Bank, or merely communicated Deutsche Bank’s refusal. As such, BAC cannot be dismissed outright as it may be liable on this claim.”

“The next issue in this case is whether Stewart is time-barred from seeking rescission in court. “Under the Truth in Lending Act, [] 15 U.S.C. § 1601 et seq., when a loan made in a consumer credit transaction is secured by the borrower’s principal dwelling, the borrower may rescind the loan agreement” under certain conditions. Beach v. Ocwen Fed. Bank, 523 U.S. 410, 411 (1998). A borrower typically has three days to rescind following execution of the transaction or delivery of the required disclosures. See 15 U.S.C. § 1635(a). However, under § 1635(f) of TILA, the right of rescission is extended to “three years after the date of consummation of the transaction or upon the sale of the property, whichever occurs first,” if any of the required disclosures are not delivered to the borrower. See 15 U.S.C. § 1635(f). Stewart alleges that she did not receive the required disclosures, so this case involves the extended three year period. Here, the loan transaction occurred on October 24, 2006; Stewart sent a letter electing to rescind the transaction on October 14, 2009, and then filed her complaint in court on April 1, 2010. This time line presents the legal question of whether a claim for rescission filed after the three-year time period is timely if a rescission letter is sent within the three-year time period.”

Stewart acknowledges that she did not send a notice of rescission to defendant Deutsche Bank. (See Doc. 23-1.) She alleges that she, like many borrowers, was unaware who owned her mortgage note. She did not know that Deutsche Bank was the assignee of her loan, and so she requested notice of the “identity of the owner of this note” from Home 123 and BAC in her rescission letter. (Id.) Stewart argues that she complied with TILA and Regulation Z by mailing notice to the original creditor, Home 123, and the loan servicer, BAC. Stewart distinguishes Harris from the current case because “there is no mention of whether the consumer in Harris mailed a notice to the loan servicer or another party who may be the agent of the holder of the note.” (Doc. 23 at 4). Deutsche Bank concurs that mortgage ownership changes make communication difficult, but suggests that this actually supports the approach of the Harris court. Harris noted that “adopting Stewart’s interpretation of the notice requirement . . . would have the absurd effect of subjecting to rescission and damages assignees that, in some case, have absolutely no means of discovering that a rescission demand has been made.” (Doc. 22 at 2 (quoting Harris).)”

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ILLINOIS Judge Not Clear, “Discovery IS Necessary On Rescission Claims” STEWART v. BAC, DEUTSCHE BANK, MERS

ILLINOIS Judge Not Clear, “Discovery IS Necessary On Rescission Claims” STEWART v. BAC, DEUTSCHE BANK, MERS

ELLIE STEWART, Plaintiff,
v.
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST CO., and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., Defendants.

Case No. 10 C 2033.

United States District Court, N.D. Illinois, Eastern Division.

March 10, 2011.

MEMORANDUM OPINION AND ORDER

VIRGINIA M. KENDALL, District Judge.

On April 1, 2010, plaintiff Ellie Stewart (“Stewart”) filed the current complaint against Defendants BAC Home Loans Servicing (“BAC”), Deutsche Bank National Trust Company (“Deutsche Bank”) and Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems (“MERS”) (together, “Defendants”) alleging violations of the Truth In Lending Act (“TILA”) (15 U.S.C. §§ 1601-1667f) and its implementing regulation, 12 C.F.R. § 226 (“Regulation Z”), and demanded rescission of the mortgage on her residence.

Defendants moved to dismiss the Complaint, asserting BAC and MERS are improper defendants under TILA, the Complaint is time-barred and the Complaint fails to state a claim. For the reasons stated below, Defendants’ motion is granted in part and denied in part. The Court dismisses Stewart’s failure to disclose claim because it is untimely, but denies dismissal of Stewart’s rescission claim. The motion to dismiss is denied with regard to the failure to honor rescission claim against defendants Deutsche Bank and BAC.

I. BACKGROUND

A. Complaint Allegations.

Stewart owns her residence in Chicago, Illinois. (Compl., Doc. 1, ¶ 4.) On October 24, 2006, Stewart refinanced her mortgage on this residence through Home 123 Corporation (“Home 123″). (Compl. ¶¶ 5-8, 10.) Home 123 filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in April 2007 and Deutsche Bank is the current assignee of this loan. (Compl. ¶¶ 5, 8, 21.) BAC services this loan and MERS is the nominee. (Compl. ¶¶ 7-9; Ex. C.)

This case stems from a dispute concerning the documentation provided at the closing of Stewart’s refinance back in 2006. Stewart alleges that Home 123 violated TILA twice in regards to these documents. First, she claims that Home 123 did not provide her with a copy of the Notice of Right to Cancel (“NORTC”). (Compl. ¶¶ 19-20.) Second, she claims that Home 123 provided a Truth in Lending Disclosure Statement (“TILDS”) that was incomplete because it did not include the timing of the required loan payments. (Compl. ¶¶ 17-18.)

Due to these deficiencies, on October 14, 2009, Stewart’s attorneys sent a letter entitled “Notice of Rescission and Lien” to Home 123 and BAC. (Compl. ¶ 23.) The letter stated that “Ms. Stewart hereby elects to cancel the loan of October 24, 2006 for failure to comply with the Truth In Lending Act,” and specified that Home 123 failed to provide the NORTC and a complete TILDS. (See Doc. 23-1.) The letter also demanded the identity of the owner of the mortgage. (Id.) On January 26, 2010, BAC sent a letter to Stewart which denied her rescission claim. (See Doc. 23-2.) BAC asserted that Stewart’s right to rescind had expired and attached copies of the NORTC and TILDS purportedly signed by Stewart and dated October 24, 2006. (Id.)

B. Procedural History.

On April 1, 2010, Stewart filed this suit and it was assigned to Judge Harry Leinenweber. Defendants filed the present motion to dismiss on August 11 and briefing was completed on October 5. On October 28, Judge Leinenweber requested that the parties provide a copy of Stewart’s rescission letter and submit a supplemental brief addressing whether Stewart’s election to rescind constituted proper notice to Deutsche Bank as assignee of Home 123. Supplemental briefing was completed on November 8. The case was transferred to this Court on December 8.

II. LEGAL STANDARD

A motion to dismiss should be granted if the complaint fails to satisfy Rule 8’s pleading requirement of “a short and plain statement of the claim showing that the pleader is entitled to relief.” Fed. R. Civ. P. 8. “To survive a motion to dismiss, a complaint must contain sufficient factual matter, accepted as true, to `state a claim to relief that is plausible on its face.’” Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 129 S. Ct. 1937, 1949 (2009) (quoting Bell Atl. Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544, 570 (2007)); see also Tamayo v. Blagojevich, 536 F.3d 1074, 1081 (7th Cir. 2008) (holding well-leaded allegation of the complaint must be accepted as true).

Although a complaint does not need detailed factual allegations, it must provide the grounds of the claimant’s entitlement to relief, contain more than labels, conclusions, or formulaic recitations of the elements of a cause of action, and allege enough to raise a right to relief above the speculative level. Twombly, 550 U.S. at 555. Legal conclusions can provide a complaint’s framework, but unless well-pleaded factual allegations move the claims from conceivable to plausible, they are insufficient to state a claim. Iqbal, 129 S. Ct. at 1950-51.

III. DISCUSSION

The complaint has three core claims. First, Stewart claims that Home 123 violated TILA by failing to provide her with the NORTC and a complete TILDS. For this “failure to disclose” claim, Stewart seeks statutory damages of $4,000 from Deutsche Bank as Home 123’s assignee. (Doc. 1, Prayer for Relief.) Second, Stewart seeks recession of the loan based on this disclosure violation. For this “loan rescission” claim, Stewart seeks a judgment forcing Defendants to void the loan and return her to the position she occupied before entering into the mortgage. (Id.) Third, Stewart alleges that Defendants failed to honor her election to rescind, which is itself a violation of TILA. For this “failure to honor rescission” claim, Stewart seeks actual damages and statutory damages of $4,000 from Defendants. As an additional remedy for all three claims, Stewart seeks an order requiring Defendants to delete all adverse credit information relating to the loan. (Id.)

The present motion presents four legal issues that need to be resolved to determine which, if any, of these three claims may stand. First, Defendants seek to dismiss BAC and MERS, asserting that servicers and nominees are improper defendants in a TILA action. Turning to Stewart’s individual claims, Defendants argue that the failure to disclose claim is barred by a one year statute of limitations because the alleged violation occurred over three years ago. Next, Defendants assert that the rescission claim is barred by a three-year statute of repose because the loan closed on October 24, 2006 but this suit was not filed until April 1, 2010. Finally, Defendants argue that the failure to honor rescission claim fails because assignees are not liable for TILA violations which are not apparent on the face of the loan disclosures.

A. Liability of MERS and BAC Under TILA.

Only creditors and assignees are subject to liability under TILA. See 15 U.S.C. §§ 1640, 1641(a). Stewart acknowledges that MERS is not a creditor or assignee. (See Doc. 15 at 4).[1] Therefore, MERS is not subject to damages under TILA and Stewarts’ failure to disclose and failure to honor rescission damages claims against MERS are dismissed. See 15 U.S.C. §§ 1640, 1641(a); see also Horton v. Country Mortg. Servs., Inc., No. 07 C 6530, 2010 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 67, at *3 (N.D. Ill. Jan 4, 2010) (granting summary judgment to MERS because the plaintiff provided no evidence that MERS was a creditor or assignee). Stewart claims MERS is still a proper party based on the non-monetary relief requested in connection with the rescission. Stewart seeks an order “voiding” her mortgage, (see Doc. 1 at Prayer) and, according to her, “this Court may directly order MERS to record a release or take other actions in connection with the mortgage document that was recorded.” (Doc. 15 at 4.)

The Court notes that courts in this District are split on whether such a party, usually a servicer, may be kept in a case based on such contingent, or future, relief. Compare Miranda v. Universal Fin. Grp., Inc., 459 F. Supp. 2d 760, 765-66 (N.D. Ill. 2006) (denying dismissal of loan servicer as an indispensable party under Rule 19 because a rescission would require return of payments made on the loan and “could impair the borrower’s ability to fully protect his or her interest in rescinding the loan because the servicer could improperly report to credit bureaus”) with Bills v. BNC Mort., Inc., 502 F. Supp. 2d 773, 776 (N.D. Ill. 2007) (finding “a concern that [the servicer] might thereafter engage in improper reporting to the credit agencies or attempt to foreclose on a rescinded loan is purely speculative and does not warrant retaining [the servicer] as a defendant”). The Court agrees with Miranda and the cases it cites because they appear more consistent with the Seventh Circuit’s holding in Handy v. Anchor Mortgage Corporation, 464 F.3d 760, 765-66 (7th Cir. 2006). There, the Seventh Circuit held “more generally . . . the right to rescission `encompasses a right to return to the status quo that existed before the loan.’” Id. (internal citation omitted). Handy makes clear that rescission under TILA entirely unwinds the transaction. Because Stewart alleges, albeit generally, that MERS may be necessary to get her back to that status quo if her rescission is enforced by the Court, MERS cannot be dismissed entirely at this time. Rather, Stewart’s rescission claim stands as to MERS.

As to defendant BAC, TILA expressly disclaims liability for servicers “unless the servicer is or was the owner of the obligation.” 15 U.S.C. § 1641(f)(1). Stewart alleges that BAC “has an interest” in the loan and, as a result, is subject to liability. (Compl. ¶ 7.) While Stewart does not provide any specifics on how a loan servicer gained an interest in the loan, on a motion to dismiss, the Court must accept this allegation as true. See Tamayo, 526 F.3d at 1081. Even if the Court could ignore this allegation, BAC must remain a defendant in any event. The pleadings reveal that the January 26 letter refusing Stewart’s rescission was sent by BAC, not Deutsche Bank. BAC is a necessary defendant on the failure to honor rescission claim because it is not clear whether BAC independently refused rescission, refused as an agent of Deutsche Bank, or merely communicated Deutsche Bank’s refusal. As such, BAC cannot be dismissed outright as it may be liable on this claim.

B. Failure to Disclose Claims.

Stewart asserts that Home 123 committed two disclosure violations during the refinance closing: (1) it failed to provide two copies of the NORTC and (2) it failed to provide a complete TILDS. Although this claim alleges violations by Home 123, the claim is currently against Deutsche Bank based on its status as the assignee of Home 123. TILA permits an individual to assert a claim against a creditor for disclosure violations so long as such action is brought within one year from the occurrence of the violation. See 15 U.S.C. §§ 1640(a), 1640(e); see also Garcia v. HSBC Bank USA, N.A., No. 09 C 1369, 2009 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 114299, at *9-10 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 7, 2009) (finding the § 1635’s three year period for rescission does not extend the one-year period available under § 1640(e) to assert damages claims for disclosure violations and noting that the majority of courts in this District have found “affirmative damage claims for disclosure violations must be brought within one year of the closing of any credit transaction”). Stewart filed this claim on April 1, 2010, over three years after the October 24, 2006 loan closing and well past the one year statute of limitations. Stewart’s failure to disclose claim is time-barred and dismissed with prejudice against all defendants.

C. Loan Rescission Claim.

The next issue in this case is whether Stewart is time-barred from seeking rescission in court. “Under the Truth in Lending Act, [] 15 U.S.C. § 1601 et seq., when a loan made in a consumer credit transaction is secured by the borrower’s principal dwelling, the borrower may rescind the loan agreement” under certain conditions. Beach v. Ocwen Fed. Bank, 523 U.S. 410, 411 (1998). A borrower typically has three days to rescind following execution of the transaction or delivery of the required disclosures. See 15 U.S.C. § 1635(a). However, under § 1635(f) of TILA, the right of rescission is extended to “three years after the date of consummation of the transaction or upon the sale of the property, whichever occurs first,” if any of the required disclosures are not delivered to the borrower. See 15 U.S.C. § 1635(f). Stewart alleges that she did not receive the required disclosures, so this case involves the extended three year period. Here, the loan transaction occurred on October 24, 2006; Stewart sent a letter electing to rescind the transaction on October 14, 2009, and then filed her complaint in court on April 1, 2010. This time line presents the legal question of whether a claim for rescission filed after the three-year time period is timely if a rescission letter is sent within the three-year time period.

Stewart argues that she exercised her right to rescind within the three years, as required by § 1635(f), because her letter actually rescinded the loan. According to Stewart, this suit is just the legal remedy to force Defendants to accept her rescission. Stewart argues that she is entitled to an additional year after Defendants’ failure to accept the rescission to file suit under § 1640(e). Defendants argue that the language of § 1635(f) creates a statute of repose that completely extinguishes the right to rescind after the three year-time period. As Stewart filed suit over three years after the closing, Defendants assert that Stewart’s recession claim under TILA is barred.

Both parties cite authority for their respective positions from many different jurisdictions. E.g., compare Falcocchia v. Saxon Mortg., Inc., 709 F. Supp. 2d 860, 868 (E.D. Cal. 2010), with Sherzer v. Homestar Mortg. Servs., No. 07-5040, 2010 WL 1947042, at *11 (E.D. Pa. July 1, 2010); see also Obi v. Chase Home Fin., LLC, No. 10-C-5747, 2011 WL 529481, *4 (N.D. Ill. Feb. 8, 2011) (Kendall, J.) (noting “[t]here is a split of authority as to whether § 1635(f) requires a borrower to file a rescission claim within three years after the consummation of a transaction or whether the borrower need only assert his right to rescind to a creditor within that three year period” and collecting cases.) Stewart’s authority concludes that a borrower exercises her right of rescission when she mails a notice of rescission to the creditor, so rescission occurs at the time of the letter. See 12 C.F.R. § 226.23(a)(2). Defendants’ authority, on the other hand, holds that a borrower cannot unilaterally rescind a loan, and therefore can only preserve her rights by filing a suit for rescission within the three-year time period. The Seventh Circuit has not yet addressed this issue so this Court has no binding guidance.

As the Court indicated in Obi (albeit in dicta), the Court is persuaded by the authority finding that a borrower may assert his rescission rights under § 1635(f) through notice to the creditor. See Obi, 2011 WL 529481 at *4; see also In re Hunter, 400 B.R. 651, 661-62 (N.D. Ill. 2009) (finding “[t]he three-year period limits only the consumer’s right to rescind, not the consumer’s right to seek judicial enforcement of the rescission” (internal citation omitted)). The approach in Hunter is more consistent with the language of § 1635 and Regulation Z than the approach advocated by Defendants. Section (a)(2) of Regulation Z provides explicit instructions to the consumer as to how to exercise her right to rescind: “[t]o exercise the right to rescind, the consumer shall notify the creditor of rescission by mail, telegram, or other means of written communication.” See 12 C.F.R. § 226.23(a)(2). The next provision of Regulation Z, § (a)(3), describes when a consumer may exercise that right: either within the three-day “cool off” period, if all proper disclosures are made, or within the three-year period, if they are not. See 12 C.F.R. § 226.23(a)(3). The more reasonable interpretation of Regulation Z is that § (2)(a)’s method of exercising the right to rescission applies to both scenarios under § (3)(a). Indeed, this approach is consistent with the wording of the statute. Even if a consumer received all necessary disclosures, § 1635(a) allows a consumer to rescind within the three-day “cool off” period after closing “by notifying the creditor, in accordance with regulations of the [Federal Reserve Board (“FSB”)], of his intention to do so.” 15 U.S.C. § 1635(a). Though § 1635(f) has no comparable reference to the FSB regulations, it seems incongruous for the FSB to allow rescission via letter during the “cool off” period—in accordance with Regulation Z—but require a consumer to bring a suit to exercise that same right to rescind under § 1635(f).

The Court’s approach is not inconsistent with Beach. In that case, the Supreme Court found a defendant could not assert rescission as an affirmative defense under TILA beyond the three-year period. See Beach, 523 U.S. at 418. The Court noted that § 1635(f) “says nothing in terms of bringing an action but instead provides that the `right of rescission [under TILA] shall expire’ at the end of the time period . . . it talks not of a suit’s commencement but of a right’s duration . . . .” Id. at 417. Beach addresses when the right to rescind expires and whether it can be tolled. It leaves unresolved the question of how a consumer must exercise that right to rescind — suit, or notice via letter.

The Court turns to the question of when a consumer, having exercised her right to rescind by sending a letter to her creditor, must bring suit to enforce that exercise. In Hunter, the debtor, like Stewart, sent notice to the creditor before the three-year period expired, but his trustee filed suit after expiration. Hunter, 400 B.R. at 659. As Stewart did here, the trustee brought suit within a year after the creditor allegedly failed to respond to the rescission notice. Id. Hunter,Id.; seeHunter approach. Under this approach, the last day a borrower may send notice to rescind is the three-year anniversary of the transaction. If the borrower has not sent notice by that time, her right to rescind expires under § 1636(f). If the borrower sends timely notice, the creditor then would have 20 days to respond after receipt of that notice. See 15 U.S.C. § 1635(b). The borrower then has one year from the end of that 20-day period to bring a suit to enforce the rescission under § 1640(e)’s limitations period. citing the one-year limitations period in § 1640(e), found that the trustee’s action for rescission was timely, as it was brought within a year of the alleged violation of TILA, namely the refusal to respond to the rescission request. 15 U.S.C. 1635(b) (requiring a creditor to “take any action necessary or appropriate to reflect the termination of any security interest created under the transaction”). The Court adopts the Hunter, 400 B.R. at 660-61, see also Johnson v. Long Beach Mort. Loan Trust 2001-4, 451 F. Supp. 2d 16, 39-41 (D.D.C. 2006) (applying § 1640(e)’s one year period to enforce rescission claim after notice); Sherzer, 2010 WL 1947042, at *11 (following Hunter). This approach balances the creditor’s need for certainty (the borrower cannot indefinitely fail to bring suit to enforce the right to rescind she exercised) with the express language of Regulation Z (which states that a borrower may exercise the right to rescind through notice by mail). Because Stewart brought suit within five months of her recession notice, Stewart’s claim for recession is timely.

D. Failure to Honor Rescission Claim.

A claim for damages for failure to honor rescission is based on § 1635(b) of TILA, which requires a creditor to respond to a notice of rescission within twenty days of receipt. If a creditor does not respond within the statutorily-mandated period, TILA permits an individual to bring a claim for damages against the creditor. 15 U.S.C. § 1640(a). An action for damages must be brought “within one year from the date of the occurrence of the violation.” 15 U.S.C. § 1640(e). An assignee’s failure to honor a valid rescission notice made pursuant to § 1635 may subject the assignee to actual and statutory damages. 15 U.S.C. § 1640(a).

Stewart asserts that she did not receive a NORTC or a complete TILDS as required by TILA, so she had a right to rescind her loan. Specifically, the TILDS does not state the timing of payments, as Regulation Z requires. See 12 C.F.R. § 226.18. Defendants respond that they were not the original creditor, and as assignees (at best), they are only required to rescind if the violations were apparent on the face of the documentation and that they were not in this case. See 15 U.S.C. § 1641(a) (assignee is only liable if the violation “is apparent on the face of the disclosure statement”).

The Seventh Circuit has specifically addressed the requirements for the payment schedule in the TILDS. In Hamm, the TILDS listed the payment schedule as 359 payments of $541.92 beginning on March 1, 2002 and one payment of $536.01 on February 1, 2032. Hamm v. Ameriquest Mortg. Co., 506 F.3d 525, 527 (7th Cir. 2007). The court found that this violated TILA because it did not list all payment dates or state that payments were to be made monthly, and TILA requires such specificity in the TILDS even though “many (or most) borrowers would understand that a mortgage with 360 payments due over approximately 30 years contemplates a payment by the borrower each month during those 30 years.” Id. This case is no different. Stewart alleges that her TILDS listed 359 payments at $3,103.53 but failed to mention that these payments would be made monthly. Exhibit A of Stewart’s complaint, her TILDS, shows the incomplete payment schedule on the face of the document. That schedule is almost exactly the same as the one the Seventh Circuit found insufficient in Hamm. Id. at 527. Consequently, Stewart alleges a disclosure violation apparent on the face of the documents which would grant Stewart the right to rescind against Defendants as assignees. Stewart’s NORTC claim does not need to be evaluated at this time because her failure to honor rescission claim could be based on either a NORTC or TILDS violation, and the TILDS allegations stand.

The final issue is whether Defendants are responsible for refusing to respond and for rejecting rescission. This turns on whether Stewart’s notice of rescission was properly sent to Defendants. In response to a request from Judge Leinenweber prior to reassignment of this case to this Court, the parties addressed whether Stewart properly noticed defendant Deutsche Bank of her election to rescind when she sent letters to only BAC and Home 123, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2007. Courts within the District have reached different conclusions under similar factual scenarios. Compare Harris v. OSI Fin. Servs. Inc., 595 F. Supp. 2d 885, 897-98 (N.D. Ill. 2009) (finding that notice of election to rescind sent to the original creditor did not suffice as notice to the assignee), with Hubbard v. Ameriquest Mortg. Co., 624 F. Supp. 2d 913, 921-22 (N.D. Ill. 2008) (concluding that an election to rescind sent to the original creditor is sufficient to seek rescission against an assignee) and Schmit v. Bank United FSB et al., No. 08 C 4575, 2009 WL 320490, at *3 (N.D. Ill. Feb. 6, 2009) (acknowledging disagreement between Harris and Hubbard and following Hubbard).

Stewart acknowledges that she did not send a notice of rescission to defendant Deutsche Bank. (See Doc. 23-1.) She alleges that she, like many borrowers, was unaware who owned her mortgage note. She did not know that Deutsche Bank was the assignee of her loan, and so she requested notice of the “identity of the owner of this note” from Home 123 and BAC in her rescission letter. (Id.) Stewart argues that she complied with TILA and Regulation Z by mailing notice to the original creditor, Home 123, and the loan servicer, BAC. Stewart distinguishes Harris from the current case because “there is no mention of whether the consumer in Harris mailed a notice to the loan servicer or another party who may be the agent of the holder of the note.” (Doc. 23 at 4). Deutsche Bank concurs that mortgage ownership changes make communication difficult, but suggests that this actually supports the approach of the Harris court. Harris noted that “adopting Stewart’s interpretation of the notice requirement . . . would have the absurd effect of subjecting to rescission and damages assignees that, in some case, have absolutely no means of discovering that a rescission demand has been made.” (Doc. 22 at 2 (quoting Harris).)

The split between Harris and Hubbard does not need to be resolved at this stage of litigation due to the particular facts of this case. Stewart alleges that she sent BAC the rescission notice on October 14, 2009, ten days before the three-year deadline. BAC denied the rescission in a letter sent to Stewart on January 26, 2010. While Harris was concerned that an innocent party with no notice could be subject to damages, this case involves clear notice to at least one party that Stewart seeks to hold responsible. BAC received notice, did not respond within 20 days, and then refused to rescind the transaction. Deutsche Bank’s involvement is less clear, but Stewart alleged sufficient facts to proceed with her case under the theory that BAC either forwarded the notice to Deutsche Bank or acted as its agent in the transaction. This is a reasonable inference given that BAC, the loan servicer, actually responded to the rescission notice and refused it without referring to whether the assignee, Deutsche Bank, assented to the decision. BAC, Deutsche Bank, or both refused to rescind the transaction and discovery is necessary to sort out who is responsible for the decision to deny the rescission.

IV. CONCLUSION

For the reasons stated herein, Defendants’ motion to dismiss (Doc. 10) is:

1. Granted as to Stewart’s failure to disclose claim against all Defendants;

2. Denied as to Stewart’s rescission claim against all Defendants; and

3. Denied as to Stewart’s failure to honor rescission claim against defendants Deutsche Bank and BAC, but granted as to defendant MERS.

SO ORDERED.

[1] The Court also notes that the mortgage instrument attached to the complaint identifies MERS as “a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for Lender and Lender’s assigns.” (See Doc. 1, Ex. C at 1.) Though Stewart alleges MERS has an interest in the loan (see Compl. ¶ 7), the exhibits contradict that pleading and the exhibits control. See N. Ind. Gun & Outdoor Shows, Inc. v. City of S. Bend, 163 F.3d 449, 454 (7th Cir. 1998).

WHAT NOT TO DO IN PLEADING AND MOTION PRACTICE

REGISTER NOW FOR DISCOVERY AND MOTION PRACTICE WORKSHOP

(2006) Here is a case that should not have been filed (entire text of opinion below) and was argued improperly. The homeowners clearly lost because they put their eggs in the wrong basket. Nonetheless, the opinion is a pretty good compilation of the various statutes, rules and regulations affecting mortgages and their enforcement.

An interest quote used against the “homeowner” which itself was a trust, is that the word “interest” should be interpreted to mean “Ownership interest”. This is precisely the argument I advance regarding the holders of of certificates or even non-certificated mortgage-backed securities whose indenture is the prospectus. Those investors received at the very least a “beneficial” interest in the loans. Thus either the prospectus, the certificate or both are starting points, in addition to the note signed by the borrower, as evidence of the terms and status of the obligation.

CAROL R. ROSEN, Plaintiff,
v.
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION as TRUSTEE, EQUIFIRST CORP., AMERICAN MORTGAGE SPECIALISTS, INC., and JOHN and JANE DOES 1-10, Defendants.

CIV-06-0427 JH/LAM.

  1. DON’T TRY OUT NEW THEORIES IN PLEADINGS THAT SOUND LIKE THE CONSPIRACY THEORIES OF CRAZY PEOPLE, EVEN IF YOU THINK YOU ARE RIGHT. IF YOU KNOW IN ADVANCE THAT THE THEORY IS OUT OF BOUNDS IN THE PERCEPTION OF MOST PEOPLE, USE SOMETHING ELSE — there are plenty of simpler basic principles of law that will enhance rather than reduce your credibility.
  2. Beware of companies that claim to have a magic bullet to end your mortgage problems. Securitization is complex, and you need to focus on breaking it down to its simplest elements.
  3. Don’t try to win your case on a knock-out punch in the first hearings. Plan your strategy around education of the judge as to what happened in YOUR loan, using published reports, expert declarations and forensic analysis as corroborative.
  4. Don’t even think the Judge will indict the entire financial industry for what happened in your case. This will diminish your credibility.
  5. Plead causes of action that are familiar to the Judge and make sure you know and plead all the elements of those causes of action.
  6. Focus in pleadings and hearings as much as possible on the premises with which nobody could disagree — like every case should be heard on the merits, that you have a right to the same presumptions as anyone else who is pleading a claim or defense, and that you need to conduct discovery because there are facts and documents known to the defendants for which it would be over-burdensome and hugely expensive for you to get any other way.
  7. Don’t expect the Judge to be sympathetic. In most cases Judges still look at securitized mortgages like any other mortgage. In most cases Judges see challanges to foreclosures as desperate attempts to stave of the inevitable. Lead and repeat your main message. Your main message is that it is indisputable that if the facts you are pleading are true, then you are entitled to the precise relief you have demanded. KEEP IT SIMPLE. Use each hearing to repeat the previous “lesson” and add new lessons for the Judge.
  8. Do not avoid arguments of opposing counsel. Challenge them in a direct manner showing the Judge that if the attorney was correct in what he is saying, then he would be right and his client would win (if that is the case) or showing that the if the attorney was correct he still would not win his case. THINK BEFORE YOU SPEAK. PLAN BEFORE YOU APPEAR.
  9. DO NOT FALL INTO THE TRAP OF ALLOWING OPPOSING COUNSEL TO PROFFER FACTS AS THOUGH THEY WERE TRUE. Challenge that tactic by admitting that counsel has a right to put on evidence in support of what he/she is arguing but that the hearing is not the trial and you have evidence too, and you’ll have more evidence if you are allowed to proceeds on the merits of your claim. By all means, once opposing counsel has “testified” include in your remarks prepared script as to YOUR facts and YOUR conclusions. END WITH THE INESCAPABLE CONCLUSION THAT THERE IS OBVIOUSLY AN ISSUE OF FACT AND WHETHER THE JUDGE THINKS YOU WILL WIN OR NOT IS IMMATERIAL. YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO BE HEARD ON THE MERITS AND A RIGHT TO CONDUCT DISCOVERY. If opposing counsel is so sure that what you are alleging is frivolous, then there are many remedies available including summary judgment. But it is not until the FACTS come out that any of those remedies arise.
  10. Do not characterize your opposition as part of an evil axis of power. They may well have contributed to the Judge’s campaign, or otherwise have indirect relationships that do not merit recusal. This is not about whether banks are evil, it is about why are all these entities necessary to simply foreclose on a mortgage? If it is as simple as THEY say, why don’t they have the paperwork to back it up?
  11. DO NOT SAY ANYTHING YOU CAN’T BACK UP. This does NOT mean you have all the proof you need to win your case when you file your first pleading. It means that you know that if you are allowed to proceed, and you actually get the disclosure and discovery of the true facts, you will win.

United States District Court, D. New Mexico.

November 8, 2006.

Carol Rosen, Albuquerque, NM, Attorney for Plaintiff.

Rhodes & Salmon, P.C., William C. Salmon, Albuquerque, NM, Attorney for Defendant U.S. Bank.

Karla Poe, Rodey, Dickason, Sloan, Akin & Robb, P.A., Albuquerque, NM, Kimberly Smith Rivera, McGlinchey Staford, PLLC, Cleveland, OH, Attorney for Defendant EquiFirst.

MEMORANDUM OPINION AND ORDER

JUDITH HERRERA, District Judge.

THIS MATTER is before the Court on Defendant U.S. Bank National Association’s (“U.S. Bank”) Motion to Dismiss or Stay [Doc. 23, filed Aug. 7, 2006], and Defendant EquiFirst Corporation, Inc.’s (“EquiFirst”) Motion for Judgment on the Pleadings [Doc. 28, filed Sept. 15, 2006]. The Court has reviewed the motions, the record in this case, and the relevant law, and concludes that the motions are well-taken and should be GRANTED.

I. FACTUAL AND PROCEDURAL BACKGROUND

Before turning to the facts presented in the pleadings in this case, the Court takes judicial notice of cases involving D. Scott Heineman and Kurt F. Johnson, who are the Trustees of the Rosen Family Trust, of which Plaintiff Carol R. Rosen is a beneficiary. See Doc. 17, Ex. B ¶ 4.A. Heineman and Johnson

were the proprietors of a business that claimed to help homeowners eliminate their mortgages. [Heineman and Johnson’s] business operated under the “vapor money” theory of lending, which holds that loans funded through wire transfers rather than through cash are unenforceable. [They] claimed that, through a complicated series of transactions, they could take advantage of this loophole and legally eliminate their clients’ mortgages.

In 2004, Johnson and Heineman filed a series of lawsuits against mortgage companies on behalf of their clients, seeking, among other things, a declaration that any mortgages on their clients’ properties were void. All fifteen cases were . . . found. . . to be “frivolous and . . . filed in bad faith.”

. . . .

On September 22, 2005, a federal grand jury indicted [Heineman and Johnson] on charges of mail fraud, wire fraud, and bank fraud.

United States v. Heineman, 2006 WL 2374580, *1 (N. D. Cal. Aug. 15, 2006). The step-by-step method Heineman and Johnson advertised over the internet and used to attempt to eliminate mortgages is as follows. They would have

the homeowner prepare and sign a promissory note as well as a loan agreement for the encumbered property. The homeowner then sends these documents to [Heineman and Johnson] with a cashier’s check “of $3,000 [to eliminate a] 1st mortgage, and $1,500 [to eliminate] a second mortgage or home equity line of credit.” Once this initial fee is received, Heineman and Johnson set up a Family Estate Amenable Complex trust in the homeowner’s name, i.e., the Frances Kenny Family Trust. Heineman and Johnson name themselves the trustees. Title to the homeowner’s property is transferred to the trust.

Now in charge as trustees, Heineman and Johnson approach the bank or lending institution that lent the homeowner the money to purchase the property. They make a “Presentment” to the bank in the form of “a cash-backed bond in double-amount of the promissory note.” The “bond” is allegedly “a valid, rated instrument backed by a $120 Million Letter of Credit against the Assets of an 85-year old, $800 Million Swiss Trust Company.” This is essentially an offer to the lender to satisfy the borrower’s indebtedness. The alleged “bond,” however, is a ploy.

. . . .

In addition to the “bond,” Heineman and Johnson hire “Trustee lawyers” to “begin the legal process by sending out a legal complaint in the form of a CPA Report that outlines 40 or more different federal laws that have been violated in the ‘lending process.'” The lending institution thereafter has a certain time frame within which to respond to the complaint. Purportedly, the homeowner will be notified by plaintiffs’ legal team when the loan is “satisfied.” The homeowner’s “lender may or may not let [you] know or acknowledge this.”

Once the loan is satisfied, “re-financing begins.” The homeowner is told to “refinance [his] property at the maximum loan to value ratio possible” with a new lender. The alleged “purpose of this new re-financing is for you, the client, to compensate the Provider and CCR.” Heineman and Johnson are the “Provider.” They run CCR. The proceeds from this new loan are disbursed as follows: “The Provider receives 50%. CCR receives 25%. You, the client, receives the other 25%.” This entire process takes “5-7 months in most cases.” And, “[t]he end result is that the [homeowner] gets free and clear title to the home and a good amount of cash in hand.”

[Heineman and Johnson], however, perpetrate a fraud to “satisfy” the original indebtedness. One of the documents Heineman and Johnson present to the bank or lending institution is entitled a “power of attorney.” This document demands that the lender sign and thereby acknowledge that it has given the homeowner “vapor money” in exchange for an interest (via a deed of trust) in the subject property at the time of financing. A provision of this “power of attorney” provides that the lender’s “silence is deemed consent.” When the lender fails to respond, [Heineman and Johnson] execute the power of attorney. They then sign a deed of reconveyance reconveying the lender’s security interest in the property to Heineman and Johnson. The forged power of attorney and the deed of reconveyance are duly recorded at the county recorder’s office. The county’s records thus show a power of attorney from the lender granting Heineman and Johnson the right to sign the deed of reconveyance and the reconveyance from the original lender. The title seems clear and unencumbered. The lender is unaware of the maneuver.

[Heineman and Johnson] then turn around and from an unsuspecting new lender seek a loan to refinance the property. When the new lender conducts a preliminary title search, it discovers the power of attorney and deed of reconveyance, both of which appear to have been validly executed. From the new lender’s point of view, the property appears to be unencumbered. And it is thus willing to refinance the property.

. . . .

At the conclusion of this process, the borrower is in even worse condition than when he or she first looked to [Heineman and Johnson] for debt relief. Two lenders believe that they have valid security interests in the subject property. When the homeowner defaults on both loans, both lenders commence foreclosure proceedings. In response, Heineman and Johnson, as trustees, file a bankruptcy petition on behalf of the borrower or file suit alleging that no enforceable debt accrued from either lender because the loans were funded through wire transfers rather than cash. Fifteen such lawsuits were filed in [the Northern District of California] on such a “vapor money” theory.

Frances Kenny Family Trust v. World Sav. Bank FSB, 2005 WL 106792 at *1-*3 (N. D. Cal., Jan. 19, 2005).

The following facts are taken from Rosen’s Amended Complaint and from the exhibits attached to her complaint and to U.S. Bank’s Answer. They demonstrate a pattern strikingly and disturbingly similar to the one described above. In December 2004, Rosen quitclaimed her property located on Wellesley Drive in Albuquerque, NM to Heineman and Johnson, as Trustees of the Rosen Family Trust. See Doc. 17, Ex. B ¶ 4.A. Colonial Savings held a mortgage secured by the Wellesley property. On March 3, 2005, Heineman, acting as “Attorney-in-Fact” for Colonial Savings, executed and recorded a notarized “Discharge of Mortgage” purporting to release Rosen from her mortgage of $86,250. Id. Ex. A. The Discharge stated that the mortgage had been “fully paid, satisfied, and discharged” and that Heineman’s power of attorney to act on behalf of Colonial Savings was granted “through the doctrine of agency by estoppel.” Id. The Vice President of Colonial Savings, however, recorded an “Affidavit of Fraudulent Recording of Discharge of Mortgage,” disputing that Heineman had any authority to act on Colonial’s behalf or discharge the mortgage and attesting that the note and mortgage had not been paid. Id.

On April 27, 2005, Rosen submitted a loan application to Defendant American Mortgage Specialists, Inc. (“American Mortgage”), a mortgage broker located in Arizona, for the purpose of refinancing the Wellesley property. See Am. Compl. at ¶¶ 8, 10-11 & Ex. A (Doc. 13). Rosen subsequently executed a note for $198,305 in favor of EquiFirst, secured by a Deed of Trust on the Wellesley property. See id. Ex. A, B. The mortgage provides that, if the note was sold or the Loan Servicer was changed, EquiFirst would give Rosen written notice, together with “any other information RESPA requires.” Id. Ex. B at 13.

Rosen signed the note and mortgage on May 17, 2005. See id. at 16. The loan was closed that same day, and proceeds were disbursed on May 23, 2005, including over $29,000 to third-party creditors. See Am. Compl. Ex. G. Colonial Savings is not included in the list of payoff recipients. See id.

Lines 801, 812, and 814 of the closing statement, under the heading “ITEMS PAYABLE IN CONNECTION WITH LOAN,” show that a 1% “loan origination fee” of $1983.05 as well as “OTHER BRK FEES” of $1762 were paid to American Mortgage from Rosen’s loan proceeds, and that a $940 “LENDER ORIGINATION” fee was paid to EquiFirst from Rosen’s loan proceeds. Id. at 2. In addition, line 813 of the closing statement states: “BROKER FEE PAID BY LENDER YSP $3,966.10 POC.[1]Id. This represented a yield spread premium that EquiFirst additionally paid to American Mortgage upon the loan closing.

On June 21, 2005, EquiFirst and Homecomings Financial notified Rosen that the servicing of her mortgage loan (i.e., the right to collect payment from her) had been transferred to Homecomings Financial and that the effective date of transfer would be June 29, 2005. See Am. Compl., Ex. C. The transfer of servicing did not affect the terms or conditions of the mortgage. See id. Further, during the 60 days following the effective date of transfer, timely loan payments made to EquiFirst could not be treated as late by Homecomings Financial. See id.

On July 11, 2005, Rosen executed a Grant Deed granting “to D. Scott Heineman and Kurt F. Johnson, Trustees of Rosen Family Trust, for a valuable consideration . . .” her Wellesley Drive property that secured her EquiFirst mortgage. Am. Compl. at ¶ 26, Ex. D. The complaint does not state whether Rosen gave Homecomings Financial or EquiFirst notice of her transfer of ownership of the property to the Trust. According to her “Affidavit of Sum Certain,” Rosen made only three mortgage payments between the time she closed the EquiFirst loan in May 2005 and August 7, 2006, when she filed the affidavit. See Doc. 22.

On January 23, 2006, EquiFirst granted, assigned, and transferred its beneficial interest in Rosen’s mortgage to Defendant U.S. Bank as Trustee. See Am. Compl., Ex. E. U.S. Bank initiated foreclosure proceedings on Rosen’s mortgage and the Wellesley Drive property on February 1, 2006, in state district court. See Am. Compl. ¶ 28. On May 11, 2006, Rosen mailed a “notice of rescission” to EquiFirst, U.S. Bank, and Homecomings Financial. See id. ¶ 42, Ex. I. She alleged a right to rescind her mortgage transaction based on her claim that, when she closed the loan in May 2005, “EquiFirst failed to meet the requirements to give me accurate material disclosures and the proper notice of the right to rescind.” Am. Compl., Ex. I ¶ 7. She also claimed that “[a] broker’s fee, in the form of a yield spread premium, was fraudulently assessed to the loan transaction, . . . [which] renders the HUD 1/Settlement Statement defective, inter alia, because it does not state to whom the fee was paid . . . [and because] the charge was encoded, to the extent that no consumer or most any other person could decipher [it] . . . .” Id. ¶ 10B. Rosen claimed that these failures extended her statutory right to rescind from the regular three-day period to a three-year period. See id. ¶ 10D. Homecomings Financial, through counsel, responded to Rosen’s May 11 letter on June 6, 2006. It sent Rosen a copy of the Notice of Right to Cancel she signed on May 17, 2005, in which she acknowledged receipt of two copies of the Notice. See Am. Compl., Ex. H. It asserted that the abbreviations of “YSP” and “POC” “are standard terms within the mortgage banking industry” and that, if she’d had any concerns about those terms, she should have addressed them at closing. Id. Finding no basis for rescission, it refused to rescind the loan transaction.

Rosen filed her initial complaint in federal court on May 19, 2006, seeking declaratory and injunctive relief and monetary damages. See Doc. 1. She filed an amended complaint on July 17, 2006, that contains six claims. Count One is for rescission under 15 U.S.C. § 1635 and § 226.23 of Regulation Z of the Truth in Lending Act (“TILA”). See Am. Compl. ¶¶ 33, 48. She claims that recission “extinguishes any liability Plaintiff may have had to Defendants for finance or other charges arising from the [loan] Transaction,” id. ¶ 49, and that “Defendants [sic] failure to take action to reflect the termination of the security interest in the property within twenty . . . days of [her] rescission. . . releases [her] from any liability whatsoever to Defendants.” Id. ¶ 50.

Count Two alleges damages under 15 U.S.C. § 1640 for Defendants’ failure to comply with § 1635 after Defendants received Rosen’s rescission letter. Id. ¶¶ 51-52. Count Three is for recoupment of a statutory penalty provided under § 1640. In support, Rosen lists twenty-eight alleged violations of various federal and state statutes and regulations. See id. ¶¶ 54(a)-(bb).

Count Four alleges violation of a right to Equal Credit Opportunity as described in 12 C.F.R. § 202.14. In support, Rosen alleges that the Defendants failed to make clear and conspicuous disclosures, and that various documents were confusing. See id. ¶ 55.

Count Five alleges violations of the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (“RESPA”), 12 U.S.C. §§ 2601-17. Rosen claims that Defendants failed to give her fifteen days notice before the loan servicing contract was assigned from EquiFirst to Homecomings Financials in violation of § 2605(b), see Am. Compl. ¶¶ 57-59, and that EquiFirst’s payment of the yield-spread premium to American Mortgage constituted an illegal fee or “kickback” violating 12 U.S.C. § 2607(a)[2], see id. ¶ 60. Additionally, she alleges that EquiFirst and American Mortgage engaged in “fee splitting” in violation of § 2607(d)[3]. Id. ¶ 61.

Court Six alleges violation of the New Mexico Unfair Practices Act, N.M.S.A. §§ 57-12-1 et seq., based on the same allegations that EquiFirst and American Mortgage engaged in illegal kickback and fee-splitting activities that caused her to pay a higher interest rate. See Am. Compl. ¶¶ 63-68, 76.

Rosen seeks: (i) a judicial declaration that she validly rescinded the loan and is not liable for any finance or other charges and has no liability whatsoever to Defendants; (ii) an order requiring Defendants to terminate their security interest in her home; (iii) an injunction enjoining Defendants from maintaining foreclosure proceedings or otherwise taking steps to deprive her of ownership of the property; (iv) an award of statutory damages and penalties; and (v) attorney fees. See id. at 26-27.

II. LEGAL STANDARDS

U.S. Bank’s motion to dismiss is brought pursuant to Fed R. Civ. P. 12(b)(6). It asserts that Rosen has failed to state claims under particular statutes and that other claims are time-barred. It urges the Court to abstain from asserting jurisdiction over any remaining claims that should be resolved in the pending state foreclosure action. EquiFirst moves for dismissal under Fed. R. Civ. P. 12(c) (“Judgment on the Pleadings”), asserting that it is entitled to judgment as a matter of law on Counts One through Four and Count Six, and on part of Count Five of Rosen’s amended complaint. In resolving motions brought under either Rule 12(b)(6) or 12(c), the Court must

accept all facts pleaded by the non-moving party as true and grant all reasonable inferences from the pleadings in favor of the same. Judgment on the pleadings should not be granted “unless the moving party has clearly established that no material issue of fact remains to be resolved and the party is entitled to judgment as a matter of law.” United States v. Any & All Radio Station Transmission Equip., 207 F.3d 458, 462 (8th Cir. 2000). As with . . . motions to dismiss under Rule 12(b)(6), documents attached to the pleadings are exhibits and are to be considered in [reviewing] . . . [a] 12(c) motion. See Hall v. Bellmon, 935 F.2d 1106, 1112 (10th Cir. 1991); Fed. R. Civ. P. 10(c).

Park Univ. Enter., Inc. v. Am. Cas. Co. of Reading, PA, 442 F.3d 1239, 1244 (10th Cir. 2006).

It is true that dismissal under Rule 12(b)(6) is a harsh remedy which must be cautiously studied, not only to effectuate the spirit of the liberal rules of pleading but also to protect the interests of justice. It is also well established that dismissal of a complaint is proper only if it appears to a certainty that plaintiff is entitled to no relief under any state of facts which could be proved in support of the claim.

Moore v. Guthrie, 438 F.3d 1036, 1039 (10th Cir. 2006) (internal quotation marks and citations omitted). “The court’s function on a Rule 12(b)(6) motion is not to weigh potential evidence that the parties might present at trial, but to assess whether the plaintiff’s complaint alone is legally sufficient to state a claim for which relief may be granted.” Miller v. Glanz, 948 F.2d 1562, 1565 (10th Cir. 1991).

In reviewing a pro se complaint, a court applies the same legal standards applicable to pleadings counsel has drafted, but is mindful that the complaint must be liberally construed. See Hall v. Bellmon, 935 F.2d 1106, 1110 (10th Cir. 1991). But “[t]he broad reading of the plaintiff’s complaint does not relieve the plaintiff of alleging sufficient facts on which a recognized legal claim could be based.” Id.

[T]he [pro se] plaintiff whose factual allegations are close to stating a claim but are missing some important element that may not have occurred to him, should be allowed to amend his complaint. Nevertheless, conclusory allegations without supporting factual averments are insufficient to state a claim on which relief can be based. This is so because a pro se plaintiff requires no special legal training to recount the facts surrounding his alleged injury, and he must provide such facts if the court is to determine whether he makes out a claim on which relief can be granted. Moreover, in analyzing the sufficiency of the plaintiff’s complaint, the court need accept as true only the plaintiff’s well-pleaded factual contentions, not his conclusory allegations.

Id. (citations omitted). The legal sufficiency of a complaint is a question of law. See Moore, 438 F.3d at 1039.

III. ANALYSIS

A. ROSEN FAILS TO STATE A CLAIM FOR RESCISSION.

In transactions covered by the TILA, the borrower is entitled to rescind the transaction. See § 1635(a). The right to rescind lasts for three days, if the lender has given the borrower the disclosures required by the TILA and a notice of the right to rescind; the right lasts up to three years if the lender fails to give the requisite disclosures and notice, unless the borrower sells or transfers the property to someone else before the end of the three-year period[4]. See § 1635(f). EquiFirst asserts that Rosen’s right to rescind expired by operation of law upon her transfer of her ownership interest in the Wellesley Drive property to Heineman and Johnson as Trustees of the Rosen Family Trust. Rosen contends, however, that because she did not actually sell the Wellesley Drive property and maintains a beneficial interest in remaining in the house (apparently by the terms of the Trust, which is not part of the record), her right to rescind has not expired.

Congress gave the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System broad authority to promulgate extensive regulations implementing the TILA, see 15 U.S.C. § 1604(a), which it calls Regulation Z, see 12 C.F.R. § 226.1(a). In interpreting and implementing § 1635(f), Regulation Z specifically provides that the borrower’s right to rescind immediately expires not only “upon sale of the property,” but also “upon transfer of all of the [borrower’s] interest in the property.” 12 C.F.R. § 226.23(a)(3). The parties do not point to anything within the TILA, Regulation Z, or case law that further defines the extent of the borrower’s interest that must be transferred in order to trigger expiration of the right to rescind, and the Court has found none in its own research.

But the Court concludes that the words “all of the [borrower’s] interest” means all of the borrower’s ownership or title interest for several reasons. First, the Board clarified through § 226.23(a)(3) that something less than an outright sale of the property triggers expiration of the right to rescind. Second, because TILA provides for penalties when a lender fails to comply with rescission requirements and gives the lender only twenty days to return earnest money, down payments, and accrued interest and payments and to remove the security interest after receiving notice of the recission letter, see 15 U.S.C. § 1635(b), the lender must be able to quickly ascertain whether the borrower still legally owns the property securing the loan and has a statutory right to rescind. The only way to timely accomplish this goal is to examine the real property records in the county where the real property title is recorded. If, as here, those records demonstrate that the borrower has transferred her ownership and legal interests in the property, for valuable consideration, to another entity controlled by someone other than the borrower, the lender can reasonably contest the borrower’s right to rescission without fear of penalty. Trust documents that may contractually grant various types of beneficial interests after the sale or transfer of all of a borrower’s ownership interest in property are not generally filed in the public records, and a lender should not be required to assume that a beneficial interest of some sort may secretly exist that would hypothetically extend the borrower’s right to rescission. It is therefore consistent with the TILA’s goals to interpret “interest” as “ownership interest. See Williams v. Homestake Mortgage Co., 968 F.2d 1137, 1140 (11th Cir. 1992) (noting that “another goal of § 1635(b) [‘s recission requirement] is to return the parties most nearly to the position they held prior to entering the transaction”).

“Although the right to rescind is statutorily granted [in the TILA], it remains an equitable doctrine subject to equitable considerations.. . . Thus, district courts are to consider traditional equitable notions in applying [the TILA’s] statutory grant of rescission.” Brown v. Nat’l Permanent Fed. Sav. & Loan Ass’n , 683 F.2d 444, 447 (D.C. Cir. 1982); see In re Ramirez, 329 B.R. 727, 738 (D. Kan. 2005) (stating that, “[r]escission, whether statutory or common law, is an equitable remedy. Its relief, in design and effect, is to restore the parties to their pre-transaction positions. The TILA authorizes the courts to apply equitable principles to the rescission process. . . . [W]ithin the context of the TILA, rescission is a remedy that restores the status quo ante.”). Because Rosen has transferred her ownership of the property to a third party, the parties cannot be returned to their pre-transaction positions, which would unfairly prejudice EquiFirst if she maintained the right to recission. Cf., e.g., Powers v. Sims & Levin, 542 F.2d 1216, 1221-22 (4th Cir. 1976) (holding that a court could condition the borrowers’ continuing right of rescission upon tender to the lender of all of the funds spent by the lender in discharging the earlier indebtedness of the borrowers as well as the value of the home improvements). Without legal ownership of the Wellesley property to use as security for another mortgage, Rosen most likely could not return the $198,305 EquiFirst gave to her and her creditors. Equity therefore requires that the Court interpret § 226.23(a)(3) to provide for expiration of the right to rescission upon the transfer of a borrower’s ownership interest in the property securing a loan. See Beach v. Ocwen Fed. Bank, 523 U.S. 410, 411-12, 417-19 (1998) (noting that “a statutory right of rescission could cloud a bank’s title on foreclosure, [so] Congress may well have chosen to circumscribe that risk” by “governing the life” of the right to rescission with absolute expiration provisions under § 1635(f), “while permitting recoupment damages regardless of the date a collection action may be brought,” and holding that a borrower may not assert the right to rescind as an affirmative defense in a collection action after the right has expired by operation of law).

Finally, TILA is a strict liability statute. See Mars v. Spartanburg Chrysler Plymouth, Inc., 713 F.2d 65, 67 (4th Cir. 1983) (“To insure that the consumer is protected, as Congress envisioned, requires that the provisions of [the TILA and Regulation Z] be absolutely complied with and strictly enforced.”); Thomka v. A.Z. Chevrolet, Inc., 619 F.2d 246, 248 (3d Cir.1980) (noting that the TILA and its regulations mandate a standard of disclosure of certain information in financing agreements and enforce that mandate by “a system of strict liability in favor of consumers who have secured financing when this standard is not met”). There should, therefore, be a bright line delineating the borrower’s and lender’s rights and responsibilities. Interpreting § 226.23(a)(3) to mean that transfer of all of the borrower’s ownership interest in the property securing a loan triggers expiration of the right to rescission preserves an easily-ascertainable bright line.

The Court concludes that, when Rosen transferred her ownership interest in the Wellesley Drive property to a Trust with Trustees other than herself on July 11, 2005, her right to rescission expired that same date by operation of law. Her May 11, 2006, recission letter was untimely and ineffective. She therefore cannot state a cause of action for rescission, and Count One must be dismissed. Accordingly, her claims stated in Count Two for monetary damages and penalties arising from Defendants’ refusal to rescind the refinancing contract must also be dismissed.

B. CLAIMS FOR DAMAGES UNDER TILA ARE TIME BARRED.

“Section 1640 is a general ‘civil liability’ section in the TILA. In subsection (a) it provides for either actual and/or statutory damages for various TILA violations” set forth in parts B, D, and E of the subchapter. Baker v. Sunny Chevrolet, Inc., 349 F.3d 862, 870 (6th Cir. 2003); § 1640(a) (providing liability for creditors who fail to comply with “any requirements imposed under this part, including any requirement under section 1635 of this title, or part D or E of this subchapter”). Count Three, for recoupment of a statutory penalty provided under § 1640 alleges violations of not only TILA, but also of various other non-TILA regulations and the New Mexico UCC. Insofar as Rosen attempts to recover damages for violation of statutes not listed in § 1640(a), she has failed to state a claim.

Further, her claims for failing to disclose information or otherwise violating subchapter B at the time of closing must be dismissed as time barred. As both U.S. Bank and EquiFirst point out, claims for damages under § 1640 of TILA have a one-year limitations period. See § 1640(e) (“Any action under this section may be brought in any United States district court, or in any other court of competent jurisdiction, within one year from the date of the occurrence of the violation . . . .”). A review of Rosen’s complaint reveals that all alleged violations of subchapter B occurred at or before closing on May 17, 2005, but she did not file her complaint until more than one year later. Count Three must be dismissed.

D. ROSEN FAILS TO STATE A CLAIM FOR VIOLATION OF THE EQUAL CREDIT OPPORTUNITY ACT.

The Equal Credit Opportunity Act, codified at 15 U.S.C. § 1691-1691(f), makes it unlawful for a creditor to discriminate “on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex or marital status, or age (provided the applicant has the capacity to contract); [] because all or part of the applicant’s income derives from any public assistance program; or [] because the applicant has in good faith exercised any right under [TILA].” § 1691(a). Rosen’s amended complaint alleges no facts to support a claim for violation of the Act, and she made no argument in her response brief to support amendment. Count Four must be dismissed.

E. RESPA CLAIMS MUST BE DISMISSED.

Rosen attempts to assert two types of claims under RESPA in Count Five of the Amended Complaint. The first is for violation, on June 21, 2005, of a provision that requires creditors to give a borrower fifteen days notice before transferring an account to a different loan servicer. See § 2605(b)(2)(A) (“Except as provided under subparagraphs (B) and (C), the notice required under paragraph (1) shall be made to the borrower not less than 15 days before the effective date of transfer of the servicing of the mortgage loan.”). To recover under § 2605, the borrower must allege and show actual damages suffered “as a result of the failure.” § 2605(f)(1)(A). If the borrower also alleges and establishes that the violation is a “pattern or practice of noncompliance,” a court may additionally award statutory damages “not to exceed $1000.” § 2605(f)(1)(B). Although the Amended Complaint neither alleges that Rosen suffered any actual damages as a result of EquiFirst’s failure to give her a full 15-days notice of the change of loan servicer, nor alleges that EquiFirst engaged in a pattern or practice of not complying with the 15-day notice requirement, Rosen requests that the Court “reduce the amount owed by Plaintiff by the amount of statutory and actual damages available under RESPA.” Am. Compl. at 22.

Because she has not alleged she suffered actual damages, the Court concludes that Rosen has failed to state a claim for damages under § 2605 and that she should not be given an opportunity to amend her complaint because none of the Defendants have attempted, in this federal suit, to bring any claims for money Rosen owes them. Any claims for recoupment that Rosen may be able to bring are relevant to the state foreclosure action and should be litigated there. Cf. Demmler v. Bank One NA, 2006 WL 640499, *5 (S.D. Ohio, Mar. 9, 2006) (alternatively holding that the plaintiff’s claims brought pursuant to TILA and other federal statutes against lending bank and challenging validity of loan were barred because they were compulsory counterclaims that should have been raised in the foreclosure action in state court).

Rosen alleges that Defendants violated § 2607 by giving “kickbacks” or engaging in “fee-splitting” on May 17, 2005, when EquiFirst paid a broker’s fee to American Mortgage as a yield-spread premium. The statute of limitations for violations of § 2607 is one year from the date the violation is alleged to have occurred. See 12 U.S.C. § 2614. The Court concludes that Rosen’s claims for violation of § 2607 are barred by the one-year statute of limitations. See Snow v. First Am. Title Ins. Co., 332 F.3d 356, 359-60 (5th Cir. 2003) (“The primary ill that § 2607 is designed to remedy is the potential for ‘unnecessarily high settlement charges,’ § 2601(a), caused by kickbacks, fee-splitting, and other practices that suppress price competition for settlement services. This ill occurs, if at all, when the plaintiff pays for the service, typically at the closing. Plaintiffs therefore could have sued at that moment, and the standard rule is that the limitations period commences when the plaintiff has a complete and present cause of action.”) (internal quotation marks and bracket omitted). Rosen’s argument that her claim survives the one-year statute of limitations because it is one for recoupment is unavailing because Defendants have not sued her by way of counter-claim in this federal suit. Again, any claims for recoupment should have been brought as a defense in the state foreclosure action. See 15 U.S.C. § 1640(e); Beach, 523 U.S. at 417-19.

F. THE COURT WILL NOT TAKE SUPPLEMENTAL JURISDICTION OVER POTENTIAL STATE-LAW CLAIMS.

The Tenth Circuit has instructed district courts that, when federal jurisdiction is based solely upon a federal question, absent a showing that “the parties have already expended a great deal of time and energy on the state law claims, . . . a district court should normally dismiss supplemental state law claims after all federal claims have been dismissed, particularly when the federal claims are dismissed before trial.” United States v. Botefuhr, 309 F.3d 1263, 1273 (10th Cir. 2002); see Sawyer v. County of Creek, 908 F.2d 663, 668 (10th Cir. 1990) (“Because we dismiss the federal causes of action prior to trial, we hold that the state claims should be dismissed for lack of pendent jurisdiction.”). None of the factors identified in Thatcher Enterprises v. Cache County Corp., 902 F.2d 1472, 1478 (10th Cir. 1990) — “the nature and extent of pretrial proceedings, judicial economy, convenience, or fairness” — would be served by retaining jurisdiction over any potential state-law claim in this case. No discovery has been conducted in this case, and no energy has been expended on the potential state-law claims. The Court will dismiss Rosen’s state-law claims for violation of the New Mexico Unfair Practices Act contained in Count Six of her amended complaint.

NOW, THEREFORE, IT IS ORDERED that all Counts of Rosen’s federal complaint are DISMISSED.

[1] “YSP” is an abbreviation for “yield spread premium” and “POC” is an abbreviation for “paid outside closing.” Am. Compl., Ex. H

[2] Although Rosen cites 12 U.S.C. § 1207(a) as the statute violated, there is no such statute and her citation to 24 C.F.R. § 3500.14 refers to violations of § 2607. The Court therefore construes her complaint to allege violations of § 2607.

[3] See footnote 2.

[4] Section 1635 provides, in relevant part:

(a) Disclosure of obligor’s right to rescind

Except as otherwise provided in this section, in the case of any consumer credit transaction . . . in which a security interest . . . is or will be retained or acquired in any property which is used as the principal dwelling of the person to whom credit is extended, the obligor shall have the right to rescind the transaction until midnight of the third business day following the consummation of the transaction or the delivery of the information and rescission forms required under this section together with a statement containing the material disclosures required under this subchapter, whichever is later, by notifying the creditor, in accordance with regulations of the Board, of his intention to do so. The creditor shall clearly and conspicuously disclose, in accordance with regulations of the Board, to any obligor in a transaction subject to this section the rights of the obligor under this section. The creditor shall also provide, in accordance with regulations of the Board, appropriate forms for the obligor to exercise his right to rescind any transaction subject to this section.

. . . .

(f) Time limit for exercise of right

An obligor’s right of rescission shall expire three years after the date of consummation of the transaction or upon the sale of the property, whichever occurs first, notwithstanding the fact that the information and forms required under this section or any other disclosures required under this part have not been delivered to the obligor . . . .

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