CA BKR DENIES STAY, ORDERS SANCTIONS AGAINST ONEWEST, INDYMAC

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“the Court will not participate in a process where OneWest increases its profits by disobeying the rules of this Court and by providing the Court with erroneous information

NEW NOTE GAMBIT ANGERS JUDGE

EDITOR’S COMMENT: We’ve been watching this for years. If one document doesn’t work, the pretender comes up with another “original” document. They are all fake, fabricated and forged. People have been asking us since 2007, “If what you are saying why are the Judges going along with it? Why are they not levying sanctions, referring the lawyers to the Bar for discipline and referring the banks to the justice system for criminal prosecution?” The simple answer is that the Judges didn’t believe it. They were stuck in the mental trap of believing that the banks would never intentionally do something in court that amounted to perjury, subornation of perjury and fraud. The Judges could not get their heads wrapped around the idea that the banks were in the process of a fraudulent land grab. It just didn’t make sense to them. It seemed far more likely to them, from their prior experience with foreclosures, that the process was largely clerical, that no bank would foreclose if there wasn’t a good reason and it couldn’t be worked out.

In California this attitude was particularly evident but in other states, Neil Garfield and Living lies was cited as the problem because we were filling the media with false statements of law and fact. Fast forward to the present and you see an increasing number of judges getting increasingly bold in switching their position on the banks and allowing for the possibility, even the probability that the homeowners win and the pretenders lose because they are pretenders, interlopers in a process meant to satisfy the requirements of judicial economy but which was being used (nonjudicial) to get around the basic requirements of black letter law and due process requirements contained in every state constitution and the United States Constitution.

Lawyers saw the references to me and my blog and the derisive wording about me, and they got scared that if they argued the same points they too would be the subject of derision, lose credibility with the court, and lose cases. And in fact, they were losing more cases than they were winning because even if they used the material on this blog, even if they got the COMBO title and securitization search, report and analysis that lays out everything chapter and verse, they were still losing — as a direct consequence of (a) Judges prejudging the cases and (b) the lawyers and litigants failing to object immediately as the first words were coming out of the mouths of the lawyers for the pretenders and failing to object to the first documents proffered. Most of all they were losing because they failed to deny the default, deny the right right of the forecloser to be initiating any collection or foreclosure proceeding, and deny that the originating papers were representative of the actual cash transaction that took place.

If you don’t object to an allegation, you are admitting it. If you don’t object to a document, it comes in as “evidence.” And the reason the lawyers were not objecting was that they had the same mindset as the Judges. How could they deny a default when they knew that the homeowner had not made payments on the note and mortgage that was attached as copies to the pleadings of the pretenders? If you don’t make the payments, you’re in default, right? WRONG! A default occurs only if the creditor fails to receive payment, not when the borrower decides to not make the payment. A default exists only if there is a gap in payments that are due, not payments that are shown on a piece of paper. If the payments were made anyway by a third party, there is no default and none can be declared.

And the declarer of the default must be someone who has an interest in the obligation. And the default must reference the obligation which normally is on the loan documents signed at closing but in the case of table funded loans that are enmeshed in a false securitization scheme, those documents do NOT set forth the terms or the parties involved in the transaction — so they can’t be used. If the loan documents at the so-called “closing” can’t be used we are left with an undocumented transaction between the homeowner, who is not known to the investor-lender, and the investors lender who is not known to the homeowner-borrower. They each got a separate set of documents including terms, conditions guarantees, cross collateralization, insurance and other third party payments (from servicers who keep paying in order to collect higher fees for “non-performing” loans. So in terms of documents there was no deal, and if the truth was told to both real parties in interest there wouldn’t have been a deal.

Nonetheless an obligation arose between the homeowner-borrower and the investor lender because the homeowner-borrower received the benefit of funding from the investor-lender, albeit under false pretenses including appraisal fraud at the loan level and ratings fraud at the investment level. The transaction is both undocumented and unsecured. And the obligation is subject to offset from a menu of affirmative defenses, rescission remedies, and counterclaims from the homeowners borrower. The property is now worth a small fraction of what was represented at the loan level closing and the investment level closing. So the investors are ignoring any remedies against homeowners because they don’t want to get tied up in litigation in which their net recovery is negative — i.e., they owe more to the homeowner than the homeowner owes on the obligation.

Enter the pretenders who figure that if the investors don’t want to go after the homes, then the banks will and who will challenge the banks since they appear to be the lenders in these transactions, even if they are not. Their defects in documentation and the facts (they were not included in the money trail of the loan transaction) were glossed over by lawyers and judges and even the media. Now, the Judges are taking a closer look and finding that not only do these pretenders lack standing, not only are they not the real parties in interest, but that that they and their lawyers are probably guilty of intentional fraud on the court and in this case, as well as others across the country, the Judge is ordering sanctions and fines.

FROM STOPFORECLOSURENOW.COM

IN RE ARIZMENDI | CA Bank. Court Denies Stay, Order to Show Cause “Contempt, Sanctions, (2) ONEWEST Notes; 1 Endorsed, 1 Unendorsed” “MERS Assignment”

In re: Jessie M. Arizmendi, Debtor.
OneWest Bank FSB, its assignees and/or successors, Moving Party,
v.
Jessie M. Arizmendi, Debtor; Thomas H. Billingslea, Chapter 13 Trustee; and Indymac Mortgage Services, Junior Lien, Respondents.

Bk. No. 09-19263-PB13, RS No. CNR-2.

United States Bankruptcy Court, S.D. California.

May 26, 2011.

Not for Publication

MEMORANDUM DECISION

LAURA S. TAYLOR, Bankruptcy Judge

EXCERPTS:

Additional Briefing.

At the trial, the Court carefully considered the demeanor of the various witnesses and the testimony provided. In connection with the trial, the Court also reviewed all other evidence and argument appropriately before the Court. Notwithstanding, however, significant questions continued, and the Court required additional briefing in connection with several issues as outlined in the Order Setting Briefing Schedule, Outlining Preliminary Determinations, and Establishing Procedures for Final Resolution of Issues (Dkt. No. 56) (the “Briefing Order”).

OneWest’s post-trial documents provided the analysis and argument required by the Briefing Order. But, these documents also contained factual assertions inconsistent with the OneWest Declaration and the Claim. OneWest now provided a standing argument based on a new version of the Note (the “Endorsed Note”).[3] The Endorsed Note attached an allonge dated July 24, 2007 evidencing a transfer from Original Lender to “IndyMac Bank, FSB” and bore an endorsement in blank from IndyMac Bank F.S.B. OneWest argued in connection therewith that it had enforcement rights under the Endorsed Note as a holder notwithstanding the admittedly accurate testimony at trial indicating that OneWest is a servicer for Freddie Mac and not the secured creditor. The OneWest post-trial memorandum also references a separate agreement with Freddie Mac, but fails to further evidence or discuss this agreement. The OneWest post-trial memorandum, finally, bases a standing argument on physical possession of the Endorsed Note and OneWest’s alleged status as a trust deed beneficiary based on the Assignment.

[…]

But, there are key assumptions that the Court must make in order for this set of facts to withstand scrutiny. And they are that OneWest, in fact, holds the Endorsed Note and held the Endorsed Note at all appropriate points in time. Frankly, the Court is not willing to make such assumptions at this time. OneWest attached the Unendorsed Note to both its Proof of Claim and the Declaration. The Declaration stated under penalty of perjury, that the Unendorsed Note was a true and accurate copy of the Note held by OneWest. The Proof of Claim implicitly stated the same and OneWest, of course, is obligated to provide only accurate information in connection with its Proof of Claim. The problem is that the Unendorsed Note does not bear the endorsement or attach the allonge found on the Endorsed Note, a document produced only after trial and the close of evidence. One West, thus, leaves the Court with the quandary of guessing which promissory note OneWest holds, whether and when One West held the Endorsed Note, and what the explanation is for the failure to provide the Endorsed Note prior to the close of evidence.[10]

A further evidentiary anomaly arises on account of the Assignment; MERS executed this document as a nominee for the Original Lender. But the allonge to the Endorsed Note makes clear that the Original Lender assigned its interests in the Note more than three years prior to execution of the Assignment. And rights under the Trust Deed follow the Note. Polhemas v. Trainer, 30 Cal. 686, 688 (1866). Thus, MERS’ purported assignment of the Trust Deed and the related note as nominee for the Original Lender and without a reference to either IndyMac Bank, FSB or Freddie Mac appears designed to disguise rather than to illuminate the facts.

And finally, even if OneWest’s second post-trial discussion of standing and submission of evidence were accurate, one thing remains clear: OneWest failed to tell the true and complete story in the OneWest Declaration and in the Claim.

The Court is concerned, as a result, that OneWest does not hold the Endorsed Note. But, perhaps more significantly, the Court is concerned that OneWest has determined that business expediency and cost containment are more important than complete candor with the courts. On these points, Ms. Arizmendi has a right to be heard, and the Court has a right to explanation.

Further, this is not the first time that OneWest has provided less than complete information in the Southern District of California. See “Memorandum Decision Re Motion to Vacate Clerk’s Entry of Default and Motion to Dismiss Complaint; Order to Show Cause for Contempt of Court”, docket no. 39, Adv. Pro. 10-90308-MM (In re Doble; Bk. Case No. 10-11296) (Defendants, including OneWest, were neither candid nor credible in explaining failure to respond timely to complaint and submitted multiple and different notes as “true and correct”); “Order to Show Cause Why OneWest Bank, FSB and Its Attorneys Law Offices of Randall Miller and Christopher Hoo Should Not Appear Before the Court to Explain Why They Should Not Be Held in Contempt or Sanctioned”, docket no. 47, In re Carter, Bk. Case No. 10-10257-MM13 (among other things OneWest provides inconsistent evidence as to its servicer status); and “Order After Hearing to Show Cause Why Indymac Mortgage Services; OneWest Bank, FSB; Randall S. Miller & Associates, P.C.; Christopher J. Hoo; Barrett Daffin Frappier Treder & Weiss, LLP; and Darlene C. Vigil Should Not Appear Before the Court to Explain Why They Should Not Be Held in Contempt or Sanctioned”, docket no. 47, In re Telebrico, Bk. No. 10-07643-LA13 (Court concerned that OneWest provided evidence that was either intentionally or recklessly false).

The curious thing about these cases is that OneWest likely would prevail in each of them if it completely and candidly explained the basis for its motion and its standing in connection therewith. Undoubtedly, however, doing so is more costly than using a form declaration that is not customized as to the facts on a case by case basis and that is signed by an uninformed declarant. OneWest perhaps assumes that it really does not matter if the Court provides relief based on erroneous information. But, OneWest should remember an earlier theme in this decision and that is that the law is the law, rules are rules, and both must be obeyed. And, when it becomes clear that OneWest did not obey the rules, the Court can and, indeed, must act.

In short, the Court will not participate in a process where OneWest increases its profits by disobeying the rules of this Court and by providing the Court with erroneous information. The Court, thus, will take two steps. First, the Court will deny the Stay Motion without prejudice based first on the evidentiary problems that make it impossible for the Court to determine that OneWest is properly before the Court and that render evidence critical to OneWest’s prima facie case unreliable and second based on the Court’s inherent authority to regulate and control proceedings. Next, the Court hereafter will issue an order to show cause why One West should not be held in contempt and/or otherwise sanctioned. In connection therewith, the Court will consider a compensatory sanction to include a recovery of any costs Ms. Arizmendi would not have incurred but for OneWest’s improper actions. The compensatory sanction, frankly, could be quite limited. But, the Court also believes that a coercive sanction may well be appropriate. Given the orders to show cause that pre-date the one this Court will issue, it appears that the Court must create an economic disincentive for OneWest that will counter balance the economic benefit of a lack of complete candor. Further detail on the Court’s sanctions considerations will be set forth in the order to show cause and will not be further discussed here.

The Court finally notes that the order to show cause will issue only as to OneWest and possibly as to MERS. OneWest uses a variety of law firms. The Court was in a position to observe the demeanor of the lawyers handling this matter when the witness stated that OneWest was a mere servicer. The Court concludes based on this observation that they were unaware of this fact and unaware that OneWest supplied questionable documentary evidence. And frankly, there is nothing to be gained in pursuing the individual attorneys who must regularly appear in front of this Court. OneWest can simply change counsel and then be less than candid with a new set of attorneys.[11] The Court is interested in modifying OneWest’s behavior at an entity level, and any coercive sanction will be designed to achieve the same.

CONCLUSION

Based on the foregoing, the Stay Motion is denied without prejudice to the right of OneWest to refile a stay relief motion. In so doing, OneWest must provide declaratory evidence that explains when and how it obtained physical possession of the Endorsed Note and/or Unendorsed Note and that otherwise provides case specific evidence of standing given its servicer status.

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