Inflated Appraisals as Assumption of Risk and Joint Venture with the Pretender Lender

Featured Products and Services by The Garfield Firm

——–>SEE TABLE OF CONTENTS: WHOSE LIEN IS IT ANYWAY TOC

LivingLies Membership – If you are not already a member, this is the time to do it, when things are changing.

For Customer Service call 1-520-405-1688

Editor’s Comment:  

The allegation of an intentionally inflated appraisal of the property supports many claims, defenses, affirmative defenses and positions. A property that is appraised at $300,000 was usually coming in at precisely $20,000 more than the target value used for the contract for purchase or the commitment for funding a refi. The appraiser was selected, directly or indirectly by the so-called lender whom I have dubbed the “pretender lender,” so named because the borrower is deceived into thinking that he/she is entering into a financial transaction with one party — the one named on the promissory note as payee or named as the mortgagee, beneficiary or lender on the mortgage or deed of trust. In fact, however, the financial transaction took place between the  borrower and an undisclosed party while the paperwork revealed no such dichotomy in violation of federal and state lending laws).

But in addition to the documents smelling like 3 day-old fish based upon the failure of the documents to describe an actual financial transaction between the pretender lender and the borrower, the terms of the loan are different than the ones stated in the note and mortgage.

The pretender lender is merely an originator whose name is “rented” for the purpose of creating a bankruptcy remote vehicle (so-named by the banking industry) that could commit every violation of lending laws under the sun. When the homeowner seeks redress he/she finds himself confronting a non-existent entity that was never legally formed, and/or a bankrupt entity, or a dissolved entity that in any event never supplied the credit or cash for the transaction recited in the mortgage documents.

The inflated appraisal is performed by appraisers with the full knowledge that they are doing the equivalent of appraising a car’s value as being 40% above the retail sticker on the showroom  floor.  Industry standard appraisals withstand the test of time. A reasonable period of time for an appraisal to stand on its own legs is expressed in years not months. In most cases the homeowner  quickly found out in days, weeks or at most months, that the fair market value of the property was at least vastly over-stated in order to make the loan as large as possible, and, as we have seen, the inflation of the appraisal ranged from 30% to 75% in those areas that were targeted by Wall Street — with the worst offenses occurring in areas of low financial sophistication or people with language issues because they had recently moved to the U.S.

The appraiser is selected by the lender and, as stated by the 8,000 appraisers who signed petitions in protest in 2005, threatened with no employment if they didn’t come back with an appraisal at least $20,000 over the target contract price (the contract being given to them, which is a violation in itself of industry standards. Many appraisers refused and went to work only for small banks who were making loans with their own money and credit. The pretender lenders were not worried about risk of loss because the originator whose name was loaned to the Wall Street bank for a price above rubies, was not using its own money and credit. In fact, the originator usually had not money or credit, with some notable exceptions where a major institution originated the loan, but was not bankruptcy remote (thinly capitalized). None the less they were not the source of funds, not using their own money or credit and thus assumed no risk of loss for the “decline” in the value of the property after closing —a decline precipitated by the free market providing a value range that is in line with median income.

This article is meant to provoke discussion amongst both bankruptcy lawyers and civil litigators as to whether a known inflated value places part of the risk of loss on all loans, not just those that went into default. By inserting a false value into the equation, the borrower reasonably relied upon the appraiser as supposedly confirmed by the “lender” under OCC regulations. That risk can be quantified — i.e., an appraisal at $300,000 for property worth only $200,000 created an immediate risk of loss not assumed by the borrower but rather assumed by the lender named in the documents.

Thus when the loss is realized in the conventional sense, it should  be “realized” in the accounting sense and applied against the lender, thus reducing the allowable claim to the value of the property. This isn’t lien-stripping. This is contract law and assumption of risk. The borrower did not come up with the appriser or the appraisal. It was the lender and under industry standards the appraisal was presumed to be confirmed through due diligence by the lender. In the old days, the bank officers would go out and visit the property a few times and check on the work done by the apprisers. Some form of that due diligence is required under current regulations (see OCC regulations) and industry standards.

The latest time that the loss attributable to the inflated appraisal should be applied is at the time the loan is subject to foreclosure. At that time, I would argue, the amount demanded in wrong and therefore an illegal impediment to reinstatement, redemption, settlement or modification. Since the borrower was the victim of the new standards for underwriting mortgages without any announcements of new standards, the borrower can hardly be held responsible for the inflated appraisal regardless of what they did with the money from the loan and regardless of the source of funding (the real party who transacted business with the borrower where money exchanged hands).

The terms of repayment are changed by the inflated appraisal. Since the inflation of the value of the property was not only known but caused by the pretender lender, the transaction converts from a standard mortgage deal to a joint venture in which if the property value continues to go up, the lender gets its money but if the property value goes down, the lender has assumed the risk of loss to the extent that the value of the property declined — or at least that portion of the decline attributable to the inflated appraisal.

This supports fraud accusations, slander of title and a variety of other causes of action. But just a importantly it makes the pretender lender a partner of the borrower and raises an issue of fact that must be resolved by the court before allowing any foreclosure to proceed or before any attempt can be made to modify the mortgage under HAMP or redeem the property under state law. The successor lenders in the securitization chain are alleging in one form or another that the amount due is strictly computed from the amount stated on the note. But in fact, the co-obligor in the securitization chain is the pretender lender who assumed part of the risk of the loss. Any notice default or attempt to foreclose in which an inflated appraisal was part of the original transaction, regardless of the identity of the real lender, is plainly  wrong or even a misrepresentation to the borrower and the court. hence the notice provisions in all states, judicial or non-judicial, are violated in virtually all foreclosures.

But wait there is more. Foreclosures already completed can be more easily overturned by these allegations with the assistance of an honest appraiser. And for those foreclosures, whether overturned or not, the borrower can seek contribution from the co-obligor(s) pretender lender or those who used the originator as a vehicle to shield them against predatory lending claims. In our example above, this would mean that the homeowner might have a clear cause of action against the  pretender lender and its successors for the $100,000 loss in value. It would also pull the rug out from “credit bids” based upon documentation allegedly from the originating lender. If the credit bid lieu of cash was higher than the amount due, this created a barrier for others to bid cash on the property making the loan paid in full and the excess proceeds payable to the borrower.

By denying that the pretender lender used an honest appraisal and  denying that the borrower is the only obligor, and denying the debt to at least to the extent of the inflation of the appraisal the borrower puts in issue a material fact in dispute and the amount of the bifurcation of risk of loss between the borrower and the amount to be attributed to the originating lender opens the hallowed doors of discovery. affirmatively alleging that the appraisal was inflated puts the burden on the borrower, so it should be avoided if possible.


BUY THE BOOK! CLICK HERE!

BUY WORKSHOP COMPANION WORKBOOK AND 2D EDITION PRACTICE MANUAL

GET TWO HOURS OF CONSULTATION WITH NEIL DIRECTLY, USE AS NEEDED

COME TO THE 1/2 DAY PHOENIX WORKSHOP: CLICK HERE FOR PRE-REGISTRATION DISCOUNTS

Whistleblower Bangs BofA for $14.5 million in Mortgage Case

Featured Products and Services by The Garfield Firm

——–>SEE TABLE OF CONTENTS: WHOSE LIEN IS IT ANYWAY TOC

LivingLies Membership – Get Discounts and Free Access to Experts

For Customer Service call 1-520-405-1688

Editor’s Comment:

Countrywide Financial Inflated Appraisals 

For people in law enforcement this is a time when it gets to be fun going after the big guys.  Being arrogant to the highest degree going into this mortgage mess you can only imagine the ego of the Titans of Wall Street after making trillions of dollars in turning the entire mortgage process on its head and reversing all common sense criteria in underwriting loans.

The rats are leaving the ship by the thousands, whether they want to or not.  There is hardly a day that goes by that some former employee of Countrywide, Bank of America, Chase, Citi or Wells Fargo does not reveal that they were under instructions to violate regulations and law.

The inflation of appraisals of the securities and the inflation of the homes themselves was the key to the success of the Wall Street plan.  This plan was devoted to sucking out as much o the liquidity in the marketplace as they could possibly achieve.  This in itself is a reversal of even the purpose of allowing Wall Street to exist.  Wall Street’s mandate is to provide liquidity in the marketplace and not taking it away.  Instead they took the equivalent of the gross domestic product of several countries combined (including the United States) and converted the proceeds to “trading profits”.

It is good that these whistleblowers are appearing and it’s even good they are making so much money.  This will encourage other whistleblowers and will encourage those attorneys who thought mortgage litigation was beneath them.  As these cases proceed we will see more and more understandable facts emerge that explain the tragic reversal of our financial model and the historic consequences to most of the major countries of the world.

Bank of America Whistleblower Receives $14.5 million in Mortgage Case

By Rick Rothacker

(Reuters) – A former home appraiser will receive $14.5 million as part of a whistleblower lawsuit that accused subprime lender Countrywide Financial of inflating appraisals on government-insured loans, his attorneys said Tuesday.

Kyle Lagow’s lawsuit sparked an investigation that culminated in a $1 billion settlement announced in February between Bank of America Corp (BAC.N) and the U.S. Justice Department over allegations of mortgage fraud at Countrywide, his attorneys said in a news release. Bank of America bought Countrywide in 2008.

Lagow’s suit was one of five whistleblower complaints that were folded into the $25 billion national mortgage settlement that state and federal officials reached with Bank of America and four other lenders this year. His suit was unsealed in February, but the amount of his settlement had not been disclosed.

Gregory Mackler, a whistleblower who challenged Bank of America’s handling of the government’s HAMP mortgage modification program, has also finalized a settlement, said Shayne Stevenson, an attorney with the Hagens Berman law firm, which represented both whistleblowers. Stevenson declined to comment on Mackler’s settlement amount.

The complaints were brought under a whistleblower provision in the U.S. False Claims Act, which allows private individuals with knowledge of wrongdoing to bring suits on behalf of the government and share in the proceeds of any settlement.

Both Lagow and Mackler lost their jobs after raising concerns about practices at their companies and faced difficult times awaiting settlements, Stevenson said. Lagow, who worked in a Countrywide appraisal unit, filed his suit in 2009; Mackler, who worked at a firm called Urban Lending Solutions, brought his case in 2011.

“These guys are inspirational,” Stevenson said. “They both did the right thing. They should inspire other people to come forward.”

Bank of America declined to comment. A spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Eastern District of New York, which handled the Bank of America settlement, also declined to comment.

BUY THE BOOK! CLICK HERE!

BUY WORKSHOP COMPANION WORKBOOK AND 2D EDITION PRACTICE MANUAL

GET TWO HOURS OF CONSULTATION WITH NEIL DIRECTLY, USE AS NEEDED

COME TO THE 1/2 DAY PHOENIX WORKSHOP: CLICK HERE FOR PRE-REGISTRATION DISCOUNTS

%d bloggers like this: