PennyMac and Other Companies are Making False Claims as “Servicers”: Black Knight, the king of fabricated documents is behind 62% of all “servicing records.”

The bottom line is that companies claiming to be servicers are not servicers although they perform some servicing functions as “clients” of Black Knight.

This provides a veil of plausible deniability for lying in court about testimony and documents. Hiding behind litigation immunity foreclosures are being pursued and granted resulting in windfall payments to intermediaries who never had any stake in the financial stake of any homeowner transaction. 

Examination of the facts shows that the “boarding process” is nonsense i.e., a lie). “New Servicers” simply log on to the Black Knight system. There is no boarding required. It is a total lie to fool courts into believing that the records were tested when they were not. 

Black Knight is not mentioned in part because of its prior record of criminal conduct. That record gives rise to inferences of lack of credibility or questions or credibility — either one of which is enough to prevent the employment of legal presumptions arising from what appear to be facially valid documentation. Without those presumptions there is no case because none of the claimants can offer proof of transactions in which actual ownership and control over the underyling obligation can be established. 

There is nothing like an admission that can change the course of thinking by a judge, lawyer, homeowner or law maker. Except for one thing: when the party not only admits the truth of the matter asserted but affirmatively alleges it in a lawsuit against someone else.

Exhibit A, brought to my attention by multiple sources and contributors to my blog. It is a lawsuit by someone who professes to have no connection with the alleged “servicing” of any transactions that are referred to as residential mortgage loans. It is never named in any lawsuit as a servicer. It does not show up in court as the source of servicing records. It does not send any robowitness to court to say that he/she is familiar with the books and records of this company. And yet, here is Black Knight, formerly Lender Processing Services and DOCX infamy (Lorraine Brown, President went to jail).

In a lawsuit against PennyMac, Black Knight asserts that PennyMac infringed upon its proprietary system that supplies the servicing records for 62% of all “servicing” performed in the U.S., — and that means that in 62% of all foreclosures, the companies that were proffered as servicers were not the servicers or at least did not perform all servicing functions — especially, as you read the complaint, as to payment histories and relevant documents for foreclosure.

So we have the only company that was ever caught red handed with fabricating, falsifying, recording, forging, robosigning false transaction documents. They changed their name but not their business model. Their business model is being the central repository of all the data that is created, stored, and manipulated with respect to 62% of all alleged “loans.”

That makes Ocwen and other loan servicers liars. And I have successfully pointed that out in trial. When you look at the copies submitted to qualify for an exception to the hearsay rule as a “business record” you can see that this did not come off of any particular system. And upon questioning of the witness they will profess ignorance as to the location of the server on which documents and records are created, maintained and manipulated.

No document is ever produced showing that Black Knight was named as servicer for any trust. That is because the trust has nothing and Black Knight is not working for nothing. Black Knight is working for investment banks who are the prime and only drivers of all trading, administration, collection and enforcing of contracts relating to securities and homeowner transactions. The transaction data (38%) not controlled by Black Knight is primarily controlled by a Chase controlled entity in the same way.

So the bottom line is that when the servicer representative comes into court to testify as to the foundation of the payment history, there are two things to remember for cross examination.

First, the copies he/she is attesting to are not from any system owned or controlled by his company and are not the records of the trustee or trust of any REMIC Trust.

Second those records are always missing any references to what goes out. Without entries showing disbursements to creditors, the records are incomplete. Without records showing establishment of the debt as an asset of some creditor, the records are incomplete. And THAT is what undermines the foundation for the admission of the records and can lead to objection and a motion to strike the exhibit during trial.

Failure to object and failure to attack in this way leads inevitably to a finding that the documents are real and that the information is true which then proves a default because the payment history says so.

But it doesn’t prove a default and the litigator must be able to show that. A default is established ONLY when proof of ownership of the asset (Loan) is established in the name of the claimant or Plaintiff. This never happens because there is no creditor showing the loan as an asset on its financial statements.

In current securitization practices, there is no creditor that actually claims ownership under generally accepted accounting principles that require a financial transaction (payment) in exchange for a conveyance of ownership of the underlying debt as a required by Article 9 §203 UCC as adopted by all U.S. jurisdictions. And if they are not creditors then they can’t be considered lenders and therefore can claim that lender liability does not attach to them. 

And without any officer of the trustee or trust testifying that those are there records of test rust, the copies preferred by the foreclosure mill and the robowitness are just props and not evidence and do not qualify as exceptions as business records. Accordingly they are barred by the hearsay rule which stands in the way of any evidence that lacks credibility.

Black Knight vs PennyMac Lawsuit

So why am I saying all this?

Here are some quotes from a complaint filed by high end lawyers representing Black Knight against PennyMac who they say falsely and illegally used the Black Knight systems, namely MSP© and Navigator©. Here is what Black Knight says, which corroborates, word for word what I have been saying for 14 years:

“Black Knight’s proprietary MSP® System, including its interdependent NavigatorTM electronic reference and procedural library, is the mortgage industry’s leading mortgage servicing software [e.s.] package. The result of years of research, complex coding, and continuous improvement, the MSP® System is used to service over 62% of the first lien mortgage loans in the United States, providing its users – the country’s largest and most successful lending institutions – with the ability to manage their portfolios in compliance with a broad set of laws and regulations. Black Knight protects its proprietary system through secrecy, and users of the MSP® System are granted access only under strict nondisclosure agreements with individual access controls.”

Now to be sure, they will claim that they are only providing software that “servicers” use. But that is not the way it actually happens. Black Knight owns, operates, maintains all servers with an iron hand as directed by the investment banks who like Black Knight want to be out of sight and therefore out of mind of any court.

The facts that every litigator should know is that the two parties who are not mentioned — the investment bank who started ands till controls the securitization scheme and Black Knight who is the central repository for all data to make sure that there is no public competition for claiming the same loan, are the only ones that actually out as real parties real witnesses.

So then we come to the fact that claims of servicing by PennyMac are completely false. If you read carefully and make appropriate inquiries one fact stands out: PennyMac is acting under Black Knight. PennyMac may get to make certain entries which in turn are tested by Black Knight and PennyMac may get to print out copies of reports that are produced by certain algorithms at Black Knight but PennyMac has no role in creation or maintenance of business records on Black Knight, who in turn does not do anything for trusts because it has no contracts with trusts. it has contracts with investment banks.

Notice how they are keeping the agreement between PennyMac and Black Knight a secret. Also note that the agreement names Fidelity Information Services, Inc. an Arkansas corporation as the principal and PennyMac is referred to as “client”.

“Pursuant to that certain Master Agreement entered into as of April 30, 2008, together with any addenda thereto (the “Master Agreement”), PennyMac became a registered user of the MSP® System and was granted a limited right to access and use the MSP® System in order to process PennyMac mortgage transactions.[e.s.] The Master Agreement includes clear and comprehensive restrictions against misuse of the MSP® System and associated confidential materials. Due to a confidentiality requirement in the Master Agreement, as well as the volume of documents, Black Knight attaches hereto as Exhibit “A” the cover page of the Master Agreement. A complete copy of the Master Agreement is in the possession of PennyMac, but a duplicate copy will be provided upon request.”

So the lawsuit is couched as a copyright infringement case. But the real purpose is that of the investment banks — to prevent the decentralization of data records that could reveal the fact that loans were sold multiple times in multiple ways. Of course there is also the monopolistic position that Black Knight enjoyed and wanted to protect. But without the support of the investment banks it would never have filed this lawsuit,.

“The MSP® System is made of a number of interdependent “modules,” with each performing a different function in the process of servicing a mortgage loan. These modules work together synergistically to produce the familiar experience and end product that is critical to the system’s success.”

“For example, the following specific aspects of the MSP® System contribute to its unique value: data schema and fields; user experiences and interfaces; files and records; transaction-type codes and sequence codes; input, processing and output transactions; workstation guides; technical support services; and documentation of the foregoing. Data collected are organized in specific files incorporated in a table that includes multiple records, each of which is a row that also includes a series of fields or cells, each of which has a specific name and position range. The confidential logic and business rules that drive the collection and manipulation of the data provide Black Knight a competitive advantage.” [e.s.]

“The NavigatorTM application is a critical component of the MSP® System. Acting in effect as an extremely detailed electronic reference and procedural user manual, it provides authorized users of the MSP® System with comprehensive information regarding each MSP® System module and workstation necessary to understand and use the MSP® System to service mortgage loans. This includes confidential details of MSP®-specific files; data dictionaries; data schema, records, and fields; MSP®-specific transaction-type and sequence codes; processing operations associated with MSP®-specific files; and MSP®-specific input and output transactions. It also contains confidential workstation guides and other user materials explaining how to work with MSP®-specific files and initiate execution of MSP®-specific operations. The NavigatorTM application and its related documentation are made available only to authorized users of the MSP® System for limited uses and are specifically designated by Black Knight as confidential proprietary, and trade secret information.

An authorized MSP® System user can also access data from the MSP® System in real-time using MSP® Mortgage Web Services. Like the NavigatorTM application, MSP® Mortgage Web Services contains detailed confidential documentation explaining its functionality and unique and proprietary data formatting structures and request codes, among other topics. And like the NavigatorTM application, MSP® Mortgage Web Services and its related confidential documentation”

One of our prolific readers and contributors “summer chic” has offered the following information that I consider useful in framing complaints:

On June 8, 2020 Black Knight announced that former OneWest CEO (aka OCC) Joseph Otting joined Black Knight’s  Board of Directors…..
 
 Black Knight is a renamed Lenders Processing Services/DocX who forged millions of assignments which were filed in Courts around the Nations to steal homes from American families.
 
 Bill Foley (FNF) , owner of LPS, DocX, Black Knight, ect. continues its illegal practices as of today while deceive borrowers with bogus Title Insurances. 
 
Speaking about monopoly, Mr. Foley owns majority of US Title Companies.
 
PennyMac is a renamed Countrywide Financial 
 
Caliber Home Loan is a renamed Countrywide Financial
 
HomeXMortgage is a renamed Fremont Loan and Investments
 
Matrix Private Capital is a renamed Lehman Brothers
 
New OCC Mr. Brooks is also a former OneWest CEO….
 
Former BlackRock CEO Michael Bright was CEO of Ginnie Mae….
 
VA Appraisal system is controlled by Bank of America via Core Logic LoanSafe program which is  renamed Countrywide’s LandSafe Appraisal system which BOA sold to VA in 2014….
 
Ginnie Mae’s Senior VP Michael Drayne is a seasoned  fraudster from Chevy Chase bank who was sued by investors and insurers for over $5.2 Billion securities fraud. Drayne was never charged for any damages.

*Neil F Garfield, MBA, JD, 73, is a Florida licensed trial attorney since 1977. He has received multiple academic and achievement awards in business and law. He is a former investment banker, securities broker, securities analyst, and financial analyst.*

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Ocwen accuses California settlement monitor of fraudulent strip club, casino expenses

Claims Fidelity Information Services engaged in ‘fraudulent, abusive billing scheme’

Gavel scales of justice

Fidelity Information Services perpetrated a “fraudulent and abusive billing scheme” and engaged in gross dereliction of duty in its role as the independent monitor of Ocwen Financial’s 2015 settlement with the state of California, Ocwen said in a bombshell lawsuit filed recently.

In the suit, filed in California state court, Ocwen states that FIS made “fraudulent or negligent misrepresentations” in the invoices it sent to Ocwen, claiming that money spent at strip clubs and casinos, among other things, were legitimate business expenses. In its defense, FIS tells HousingWire the lawsuit is baseless, more on that below.

Ocwen also claims that FIS significantly overcharged Ocwen for its monitoring services, including claims that FIS employees worked “implausible amounts of time” on given work days. Ocwen also claims that FIS billed it for “every minute its associates were onsite, regardless of whether they were actually working.”

According to Ocwen, FIS employees “took breaks as often as 14 times a day, or were observed watching videos instead of doing their jobs,” even though FIS billed Ocwen as if the associate spent the entire time working.

In its lawsuit, Ocwen claims that it repeatedly questioned FIS about the legitimacy of the charges it levied on the nonbank, but said that FIS claimed that all invoices were for appropriate charges.

“Whenever Ocwen questioned the legitimacy of FIS’s invoices, or confronted FIS about their increasing enormity, FIS reiterated its misrepresentations that the hours and expenses reflected on the invoices were legitimately worked and incurred,” Ocwen said in its lawsuit. “By continuing to represent to Ocwen that its invoices were legitimate, FIS induced Ocwen to continue to pay millions of dollars for work that was not performed.”

Ocwen goes on to claim that FIS believed it had “free reign” to lie about its actions without fear of any consequences.

Ocwen originally engaged FIS in 2015 to monitor its settlement with the California Department of Business Oversight, which stemmed from accusations that Ocwen failed to turn over documentation showing that it complies with California’s laws.

FIS served as the monitor of the settlement for two years, with its term as the California monitor ending when Ocwen reached a new settlement with California earlier this year.

That settlement involved Ocwen making a cash payment of $25 million and being required to provide an additional $198 million in debt forgiveness through loan modifications to existing California borrowers over a three-year period.

Over the two years that FIS served as the settlement’s monitor, Ocwen claimed that its mounting monitor costs, which totaled $147.5 million from Jan. 1, 2014 through June 30, 2016 from its various settlements with regulators, were a significant drag on its business.

Back in July 2016, Ocwen disclosed that the CDBO monitor believed that “certain onboarding activities” relating to new California originations in 2015 were prohibited by the terms of the consent order, and represented a material breach of the settlement.

That led to the February 2017 settlement, in which the CDBO claimed that Ocwen committed “hundreds” of violations of state and federal law over the last 18 months, including violations of the California Homeowner Bill of Rights.

And while all that was going on, Ocwen claims that FIS was abusing its business relationship with Ocwen and overcharging the company on many different fronts.

Per Ocwen’s lawsuit, its original agreement with FIS established a $44.8 million budget for a 24-month review, including a loan-by-loan review of 50,000 loan files for California loans serviced by Ocwen.

But Ocwen claims that FIS “ran through” the $44.8 million budget for the two-year review in 11 months, while “delivering less than half of the work it was hired to do.”

Ocwen claims that FIS was on pace to charge Ocwen $120 million for the project, which would have been almost triple the project’s original budget.

Ocwen then claims that FIS “had every incentive to inflate the invoices it submitted to Ocwen,” because the company reimbursed its employees for their expenses out of its own pocket before billing Ocwen for the expenses.

Therefore, Ocwen believes that FIS intentionally ignored the “inappropriate nature of associate expenses” so it could pass them off to Ocwen and avoid its own financial loss.

“On information and belief, FIS exploited its position to enrich itself at Ocwen’s expense,” Ocwen said in its lawsuit. “It viewed this engagement as a license to steal from Ocwen.”

Ocwen’s lawsuit goes on to lay out several specific examples of “FIS’s rampant fraud,” including:

  • Submitting expense reimbursements for charges from strip clubs and casinos
  • Billing Ocwen for artificially inflated hours during which no actual work was performed
  • Submitting improper expense reimbursements that FIS associates were using as a form of supplemental income

And here’s a sample of Ocwen’s claims:

In a brazen example of timesheet fraud, FIS associates at the Coppell, Texas facility were caught watching videos on company time and leaving the office up to 14 times a day without “clocking out.” Ocwen expressed its concern to FIS and asked to see “key-swipe” data for FIS associates, which would enable Ocwen to identify timekeepers who left worksites excessively during each work day and to determine how long they were gone. FIS refused to provide the data and continued to charge Ocwen for the improper hours.

Ocwen also claims that FIS employees expensed meals at strip clubs and casinos, including expenses incurred at establishments such as: The Lodge: America’s Best Gentlemen’s Club; WinStar World Casino; Spearmint Rhino Gentleman’s Club; Buck’s Cabaret; and Harrah’s Casino.

Ocwen claims that even though such expenses are prohibited by FIS policy, the company billed Ocwen for the expenses nonetheless.

Ocwen also states that FIS employees “abused their rights to expense meals” by treating their $65 daily meal allowance as a $65 per diem, using the money to “buy groceries, personal items, and even alcohol—trying to get as close as possible to the $65 allowance.”

Ocwen claims that it brought these concerns to FIS management on many occasions, but was repeatedly rebuffed or told that the expenses were indeed legitimate.

In a statement provided to HousingWire, FIS denies Ocwen’s claims, stating that Ocwen’s lawsuit is without merit.

“The complaint filed by Ocwen Loan Servicing against FIS is completely baseless and we plan to defend ourselves vigorously against these false allegations and to pursue collection of the invoices this litigation was filed to avoid,” FIS said in a statement.

An Ocwen spokesperson, on the other hand, said that company’s lawsuit “speaks for itself.”

In a statement to HousingWire, Ocwen spokesperson John Lovallo said: “Our complaint speaks for itself, and documents that Fidelity Information Services exploited its position by submitting fraudulent, false, and improper invoices to Ocwen relating to FIS’s services and expenses. Ocwen intends to vigorously pursue all remedies stemming from FIS’s fraudulent and abusive billing scheme.”

And if you’re interested in reading Ocwen’s full filing for more of the company’s bombshell accusations against FIS, click here.

https://www.housingwire.com/articles/40235-ocwen-accuses-california-settlement-monitor-of-fraudulent-strip-club-casino-expenses

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