Trial Objections in Foreclosures

 

NOTE: This post is for attorneys only. Pro se litigants even if they are highly sophisticated are not likely to be able to apply the content of this article without knowledge and experience in trial law. Nothing in this article should be construed as an acceptable substitute for consultation with a licensed knowledgeable trial lawyer.

If you need help with objections, then you probably need our litigation support, so please call my office at 850-765-1236.

It is of course impossible for me to predict how the Plaintiff will attempt to present their case. The main rule is that objections are better raised prematurely than late. The earliest time the objection can be raised it should be raised. In these cases the primary objections are lack of foundation and hearsay.

As to lack of foundation, the real issue is whether the witness is really competent to testify. The rules, as you know, consist of four elements — oath, personal perception, independent recall, and the ability to communicate. The corporate representative should be nailed on lack of personal knowledge — if they had nothing to do with the closing, the funding of the loan, the execution of the documents, delivery of the note, delivery of the mortgage etc., or processing of payments or even the production of the reports or the program that presents the data from which the report populates the information the bank is attempting to present. Generally they fail on any personal knowledge.
The only thing that could enable them to be there is whether they can testify using hearsay, which is generally barred from evidence. If that is all they have, then the witness is not competent to testify. The objection should be made at the moment the attorney has elicited from the witness the necessary admissions to establish the lack of personal perception, personal knowledge.
On hearsay, their information is usually obtained from what they were told by others and what is on the computers of the forecloser like BofA which based on the transcript from cases run on at least 2 server systems and probably a third, if you include BAC/Countrywide. All of such testimony and any documents printed off the computers are hearsay and therefore are barred — unless the bank can establish that the information is credible because it satisfies the elements of an exception to hearsay. The only exception to hearsay that usually comes up is the business records exception. Any other testimony about what others told the witness is hearsay and is still barred.
The business records exception can only be satisfied if they satisfy the elements of the exception. First the point needs to be made that these records are from a party to litigation and are therefore subject to closer scrutiny because they would be motivated to change their documents to be self serving. If you have any documentation to show that they omitted payments received in their demand or that there are other financial anomalies already known it could be used to bolster your argument as an example of how they have manipulated the documents and created or fabricated “reports” strictly for trial and therefore are not regular business records created at the or close to the time of an event or payment.
The business records exception requires the records custodian, first and foremost. Since the bank never brings their records custodian to court, they are now two steps removed from credibility — the first being that they are not some uninterested third party and the second that they are not even bringing their records custodian to court to state under oath that the report being presented is simply a printout of regular business records kept by bank of America.
So the exception to business records under which they will attempt to get the testimony of their witness in will be that the witness has personal knowledge of the record keeping at Bank of America and this is where lawyers are winning their cases and barring the evidence from coming in. Because the witnesses are most often professional witnesses who actually know nothing about anything and frequently have reviewed the file minutes before they entered the courtroom.
The usual way the evidence gets in is by counsel for the homeowner failing to object. That is because failure to object allows the evidence in and once in it generally can’t be removed. It is considered credible simply because the opposing side didn’t object.
TRAPDOOR: Waking up at the end of a long stream of questions that are all objectionable for lack of foundation (showing that the witness has any personal knowledge related to the question) or because of hearsay, the objection will then be denied as late. So the objection must be raised with each question before the witness answers, and if the witness answers anyway, the response should be subject to a motion to strike.
THE USUAL SCENARIO: The lawyer will ask or the witness will say they are “familiar” with the practices for record keeping. That is insufficient. On voir dire, you could establish that the witness has no knowledge and nothing to recall and that their intention is to testify what the documents in front of him say. That is “hearsay on hearsay.” That establishes, if you object, that the witness is not competent to testify.
The bottom line is that the witness must be able to establish that they personally know that the records and everything on them are true. In order for the records to be admitted there must be a foundation where the witness says they actually know that the printouts being submitted are the same as what is on the BofA computers and what is on the BofA computers was put there in the regular course of business and not just in preparation for trial. And they must testify that these records are permanent and not subject to change. If they are subject to change by anyone with access they lack credibility because they may have been changed for the express purpose of proving a point in trial rather than a mere reflection of regular business transactions.
There is plenty of law nationwide on these subjects. Personal knowledge, “familiarity with the records,” and testifying about what the records say are all resolved in favor of the objector. The witness cannot read from or testify from memory of what the records say. The witness must know that the facts shown in those records are true. This they usually cannot do.
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